Category Archives: Theater

Emily Johnson/Catalyst: Kinstillatory Mappings in Light and Dark Matter

From the the Center for the Humanities, the Center for the Arts, and the Indigenous Studies Research Network (ISRN):

Join us by the fire for a gathering hosted by Emily Johnson/Catalyst that centers around Indigenous protocols and knowledges, as we welcome the evening with our campus community and neighbors. Come sit and gaze at the stars, and share stories, conversation and food (bring food to share if you wish—hot apple cider will be provided). Kinstillatory Mappings in Light and Dark Matter is a community gathering. It is a way of being and a way of making. It is research and process as ceremony. It is dance. Come join us.

Rain Location: Beckham Hall (no fire)

Kinstillatory Mappings is co-hosted by the Center for the Humanities, the Center for the Arts, and the Indigenous Studies Research Network (ISRN). It was created with funding from The MAP Fund, supported by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Emily Johnson is an artist who makes body-based work. A Bessie Award winning choreographer, Guggenheim Fellow, and recipient of the Doris Duke Artist Award she is based in New York City. Originally from Alaska, she is of Yup’ik descent and since 1998 has created work that considers the experience of sensing and seeing performance. Her dances function as installations, engaging audiences within and through a space and environment—interacting with a place’s architecture, history, and role in community. Emily is trying to make a world where performance is part of life; where performance is an integral connection to each other, our environment, our stories, our past, present, and future. Emily’s written work has been published and commissioned by Dance Research Journal(University of Cambridge Press); SFMOMA; Transmotion Journal,University of Kent; Movement Research Journal; Pew Center for Arts and Heritage; and the recent compilation Imagine d Theaters (Routledge), edited by Daniel Sack.

Her choreography is presented across the United States and Australia and most recently at Santa Fe Opera with Doctor Atomic, directed by Peter Sellars. Emily is a lead collaborator in the Indigenous-artist led Healing Place Collaborative (Minneapolis, MN), focused on the vital role of the Mississippi River in the life of residents along its path; she was an inaugural participant in the Headlands Center for the Arts’ Climate Change Residency, a member of Creative Change at Sundance, and served as a water protector at Oceti Sakowin Camp at Standing Rock. As a facilitator she has worked with artists and communities most notably during TIME PLACE SPACE, NOMAD in Wotjobaluk Country, Australia and during UMYUANGVIGKAQ with PS122 on Manhahtaan in Lenapehoking, a durational Long Table/Sewing Bee focused on indigenizing the performing arts and the world at large.

Her most recent work, Then a Cunning Voice and A Night We Spend Gazing at Stars—an all night outdoor performance gathering taking place on and near eighty-four community-hand-made quilts—premiered in Lenapehoking (NYC) with PS122 on Randall’s Island in summer 2017 and will tour to Chicago, San Francisco, and Narrm (Melbourne), Australia. Currently, she hosts monthly bonfires on the Lower East Side in Mannahatta in partnership with Abrons Art Center and is, with colleagues in Australia and Canada, developing a Global First Nations Performance Network.

Date: Tuesday, October 9
Time: 6:30-8:30 PM
Place: CFA Courtyard (Rain Location: Beckham Hall)
Facebook Event

Costume and Clothing Sale

The CFA Costume Shop writes in about one of the most highly-anticipated events of the year:

Come one come all to the COSTUME SHOP SALE. Do you want some cool new items to add to your everyday look? Are you looking for some awesome pieces for your Halloween costume? Are you not ready for the CT winter and need to stock up on warm clothes? Are you not sure what you want but love a good deal? WELL DO WE HAVE A SALE FOR YOU!!! The costume shop is hosting its annual sale. We will have everything from sweaters to pants to medieval garb. All purchases can be made using venmo or cash.

Date: Wednesday, October 17-Friday, October 19
Time: 12:00 PM-4:00 PM
Place: The CFA Courtyard (rain location will be in the CFA Theater lobby)

Unofficial Orientation Series 2018: Student Groups

This is a repost of wilk‘s update of michelle‘s update of Maya‘s 2015 post, which was an update of alt‘s 2014 post, which was an update of Q‘s 2013 post, which was an update of Syed‘s 2012 post

This is the annual student activities fair, where you can schmooze or, more likely, be schmoozed to your heart’s content.

This is part of our 2018 Unofficial Orientation Series. A quick reminder that you can check out the welcome post here and past years’ series here.

By the time classes start (aka today, happy first day of classes!), you’ll likely be successfully moved into your dorm, blissfully free from your parents, and finally finding the time to figure your shit out. Soon, you’ll realize that you have a little too much time on your hands — and you might want to fill that time with Organized Social Activities.

Thankfully for you, there are about 300 student groups at Wesleyan, so you have many, many options. Joining student groups is one of the best way to meet people outside of your dorm and in different class years. You could find best friends! Mentors! Something new about yourself! It’s all up to you.

As your Orientation Leaders, advisers, and basically everyone else including me will tell you — stick to the Rule of Seven. Each class you take, group you join, job you have, and any other thing you might do counts as one commitment, and you should try to have only seven full-time commitments per semester. With a standard four-course load, that leaves three spots for you to fill with whatever the hell else you want. That’s what this post is for.

Unofficial Orientation Series 2018: Wes Music Scene

This is an update of wilk‘s update of Maya‘s update of their post from 2015. Q wrote about this in 2013 and 2014. Some things have changed, but the scene here is still ‘unique, zealous, and sweaty.’

Delilah Seligman '16, Chris Sailor '16, Daniel Pope '16, and Harim Jung '16 performing at Middle House as Evil Deceiver, 5/4/2016

Delilah Seligman ’16, Chris Sailor ’16, Daniel Pope ’16, and Harim Jung ’16 performing at Middle House as Evil Deceiver, 5/4/2016

This is part of our 2018 Unofficial Orientation Series. A quick reminder that you can check out the welcome post here and past years’ series here.

The more I talk to college kids at other schools, the more I realize how much the music scene at Wesleyan sets itself apart. Though we have them, we are not confined to house parties and bars — there’s music nearly every day, all week. Often, there’s so much music that you can’t possibly go to it all, but you try anyway.

Once things get going, there are 3-5 concerts every weekend, sometimes even multiple shows a night. I’ve seen more bands than I have the energy to count with more variety than I can quantify simply by wandering around at Wesleyan on a given weekend. The folks who book shows at Wesleyan work very hard to bring in all kinds of groups, well-known or just emerging, from punk to dance, and usually put one or two solid student bands on the list.

Many student bands have gone on to greater things, like Overcoats, Heems (Himanshu Suri ’07) of Das Racist (Suri and Victor Vasquez ’06), Novelty Daughter, Amanda Palmer ’98the Rooks, Henry Hall ’14 of Grand Cousin (RIP), AND MORE.

Seriously. It’s very special. What’s even better is that 95% of this stuff is totally free.

2017 update: “In the past year, there have been a few new regulations placed on the student-run concert scene by ResLife and others. The process by which these regulations were implemented has led a number of student musicians into action and frustration. There are still a large number of students who are committed to the music scene on campus and its survival, but I think it’s important that we tell some of the stories that have really made an impact on the music scene.”

If you have questions like “How do I find out what’s going on?” or “How do I find people to play music with?” or “Where can I go to concerts?”, this is the post for you.

Guest Post: Showtunes Sideways and Its Lack of Trans Representation

 

Image from AuralWes venue page on the WestCo cafe. Showtunes Sideways went up in the cafe during the weekend of April 28

The following is a write-in from Kai Magee ’18. Kai reached out to us after his concept for a Showtunes Sideways performance was rejected. We decided to publish his statement (modified from an open letter to the Showtunes Sideways coordinators) in order to give a voice to someone on campus who felt like they weren’t being heard, and to hopefully address issues of trans representation and inclusion in our community.

The following views are the writer’s own.

THEISISCRAZY 2017 (PART 3): The Longest and Shortest Interviews Ever

“The last three days I’ve been working straight 9-5, and I mean 9 AM to 5 AM!”

Hello crazy thesis-ers and also crazy other people reading this! In this third installment of THESISCRAZY 2017, I bring to you the longest interview I’ve seen in my tenure at Wesleyan, clocking in at just over 20 minutes, and the shortest, at just under four. You can check my unscientific assertion for yourself by reading our archive here and checking out the first two posts of the series here and here.

If you’re interested in being interviewed (preferably for shorter than 20 minutes and longer than 4–eight to ten is usually the sweet spot!), email staff(at)wesleying(dot)org with your name, major, workspace/carrel number, and times you can meet before April 19th.

Hold onto your hats for this whirlwind of a ride after the jump!

Audition for The Laundry Room!

LaundryroomFrom Rachel Sobelsohn ’17:

Audition to be part of a staged reading of The Laundry Room, playwright Rachel Sobelsohn’s Senior Honors Playwriting Thesis, directed by Sam Morreale ’19!

The Laundry Room subverts the girl-meets-boy character convention to be a queer love story between two women with disabilities. This thesis aims to normalize disability onstage. It is a comedy, and the entire play takes place in a college laundry room.

To audition, we ask that you be a female-identifying actor. We are especially excited about working with actors who identify as having a disability, being that the goal is to normalize disability onstage. Disability can include, but is not limited to, mental illness, physical impairments, and even dietary restrictions like food allergies or celiac disease.

We are also looking for actors of color because disability is conventionally figured as white, and we wish to push against this stereotype through visible representation onstage. Even if you don’t identify as having a disability (or you do, and identify as white), we would still love to see you at auditions! We want to further a conversation about disability, and if you’re excited about that, then we’re excited about you!

The two-character play will only run about an hour. We will rehearse for two to three hours for the first two weeks, and four to five hours the second two weeks. We will present the staged reading on Friday, April 29 and Saturday, April 30 at 8pm!

No need to prepare anything as we will provide sides to read. We welcome both new and experienced actors.

Please sign up to audition here. Walk ins are more than welcome! If you have any questions please don’t hesitate to contact Sam (smorreale[at]wesleyan[dot]edu) or Rachel (rsobelsohn[at]wesleyan[dot]edu).

Date: Wednesday and Thursday, March 29-30th
Time: 4:30-6:30 and 5:30-7:30pm respectively
Place: Theater Studios, East Room
Signup: Here

Urban Bush Women -“Walking with ‘Trane”

trane_eventFrom the CFA:

Urban Bush Women returns to Wesleyan with the Connecticut premiere of “Walking with ‘Trane” (2015), an ethereal investigation conjuring the essence of John Coltrane. Inspired by the musical life and spiritual journey of the famed jazz saxophonist, the work is choreographed by founder and Artistic Director Jawole Willa Jo Zollar, Associate Artistic Director Samantha Speis, and Dramaturg Talvin Wilks in collaboration with the company, and set to live music by composers George Caldwell and Philip White, inspired by Mr. Coltrane’s “A Love Supreme” and other works.

There will be a pre-performance discussion at 7:15pm facilitated by Wesleyan DanceLink Fellowship recipient Luisa Donovan ’18.

Date: Friday, March 3rd
Time: 8pm
Place: CFA Theater

Second Stage Presents: DON’T LEAVE

Dont leaveSecond Stage here with this weekend’s show. For tickets, click here!

Description: A girl is abducted by the aliens she has been searching for her whole life. Unfortunately, her father has stowed away on the ship.

Come see the show to find out what happens next! For more information, click here.

A quick note about our eventbrite:

Each person is able to reserve up to two (2) tickets. If you try to reserve anymore than that, those tickets will be given to other people looking to see the show. Please plan to arrive 15 minutes before the start of the show. Any later than 10 minutes before the show, and you are at risk of forfeiting your ticket to someone on the wait-list.

Dates: Thursday – Saturday, February 23-25th
Times: 8pm, 8pm, 2pm, and 8pm respectively
Runtime: 45 minutes
Place: ’92 Theater 
WARNING: Strobes, flashing lights, & loud sounds
House count limited, wait-list begins one hour before showtime. No late seating. 

Guest Post: What Happened to The Vagina Monologues?

vm

Last year’s directors of the Vagina Monologues, Jessica Perelman ’17 and Eileen Connor ’18 have taken some time to write about why the Monologues won’t be happening on our campus this year.

This post comes as a way to continue conversations about the main subject of the Vagina Monologues- womanhood. As there have been continuous discussions in recent years about whether the Monologues should persist, this post comes not as a defense to “why” or “why not,” but mostly just to inform the wider campus community.

I don’t think it is too difficult to find the problems with the Monologues portrayal of womanhood, as it equates being a woman to having a vagina, a notion which is widely understood to be false. If this idea comes as new to you…. ??¿?¿¿?¿ The discussion of the Dialogues on this campus have also culminated in the creation of a more accepting and accessible version of the Dialogues called the Shmagina Dialogues. But of course, the fight for equity is still ongoing.

In general, this is a conversation we can all continue to learn from, and use to understand gender and sexuality in larger social contexts.

Find the previous directors story below: