Tag Archives: admissions

Wesleyan Releases Regular Decision Letters to the Class of 2021 and I’m Old as Shit

“Did Lin Manuel Miranda really breathe on these admissions brochures?” – Someone at WesFest last year probably

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Real news alert: according to an Instagram post from Wesleyan Admission, regular decision admissions letters were released to the Class of 2021 today at 3PM. Excitement! If you’re a current student, this means several things: (1) We’re old, really old, (2) We’re that much closer to WesFest and thesis deadline and 4/20?, and (3) many reflections on the cyclical nature of things, in times like these, in places such as right here.

There’s no word yet on our acceptance rate for this year, or whether we came close to meeting last year’s record of 12,000 applicants. I can confirm, however, that someone is predicting the Christian apocalypse to occur in 2021 and, according to several futurist blogs, male birth control is likely to be made widely-available by 2021 and Greenland is likely to move toward full independence.

But yeah, hello, prefrosh! Consider this your alternative acceptance letter:

Prefrosh Open House: A Day of Student Protest

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If you are a current student and were around campus at all yesterday, you likely saw hundreds of posters in Exley, a performance installation outside of North College, and/or the interruption of campus tours.

The multitude of actions occurring yesterday came in concert with October Open House, a yearly event put together by the Office of Admission. Yesterday’s open house (and the next one on November 11th) comes prior to Wesleyan’s November 15th deadline for Early Decision I, and is intended to give prospective students a more in-depth view of Wesleyan life than the normal Admissions programming.

A number of students have been organizing in response to conversations that happened at last week’s WhoRunsWes town hall, where more than 200 students reached a consensus to push for the removal of Antonio Farias and Michael Roth from their positions at the University. The intent of these actions was to highlight administrative failures, disrupt the Wesleyan brand, and make visible the pain students have experienced due to the institution’s shortcomings.

Read past the jump for more on what transpired, images and a video from today’s actions.

Wesleyan Sends Early Decision Letters to the Class of 2020 (HOLY GODDAMN SHIT)

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Well folks, for the past four years, I’ve been Wesleying’s dedicated Early Decision Correspondent, and alas, the time has come for me to make my last Early Decision acceptances post and pass the torch on to some other bitch who likes combing through Wesleyan’s College Confidential threads (Lord help that poor soul).

Today, admissions sent Early Decision letters to the class of 2020. That means that the majority of these lil prefrosh were born in 1998, and a couple were born in ’99 (maybe even one or two in 2000?!?!?!). DAMN. WE’RE A BUNCH OF ARCHAIC MOTHERFUCKERS.

Students Petition President Roth to Change Financial Aid Donation Policy

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A little under a week ago, I posted a video in which Josh Krugman ’14 took the microphone at a senior class reception and, immediately following speeches by University administrators exhorting members of the senior class to donate to Wesleyan, asked his fellow seniors to not donate in protest of the University’s abandoning of need-blind admissions and alleged fiscal irresponsibility. The post generated a debate over whether alumni should give to the University – informed in part by a recent letter from alumni who withheld donations on “Giving Tuesday” due to the University’s financial aid policies.

This post was followed immediately by a post by pyrotechnics about the 68% figure referenced in Josh’s speech. This post shed light on a serious problem with the way the University deals with financial aid donations:

There is currently no way for donors to increase the amount of money the University plans to spend on financial aid. Given the budget cap, there is no such mechanism for that right now, confirmed to me by President Michael Roth himself. (Again, note that there is a way to decrease the amount of money spent: not donating.) This is something I (wearing a different hat) am currently working on fixing with University Relations, with tentative support from both President Roth and Barbara-Jan Wilson.

In response to this and the fact that the number of students on grant-based matriculation aid fell this past year, Benny Docter ‘14, Danny Blinderman ’14, and Josh Krugman ’14 presented a letter to the administration calling for a revision to the financial aid donation policy. This letter, cosigned by WSA leadership, campus group leaders, student fundraisers, Greek-life presidents, and others, makes two simple demands on the administration:

1) Donors should be able to specify that 100% of their gift goes to increase financial aid for the following school year; 2) Donors should be able to specify that 100% of their gift goes into the endowment for financial aid, to be drawn at a rate equal to the annual draw rate of the endowment as a whole, and could be spent only on permanently increasing the number and quality of financial aid packages that the University offers.

The idea is that any donation made in this new manner would result in an increase in financial aid spending proportional to the size of the gift – as opposed to the current system, where all donations received are already planned for in the financial aid budget. The letter does not call for a boycott on donations to financial aid, nor does it ask for a return to need-blind admissions. Rather, it demands that the University allow those who donate to financial aid to increase financial aid spending as a total portion of the University budget in the same way that alumni donations to athletic programs or academic departments do not result in a corresponding decrease in the funding those programs receive from the University.

Early Decision Letters Go Out to the Class of 2018, College Confidential Explodes

Yes, I know, we all feel really fucking old.

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Breaking news: Some of the youngsters of the class of 2018 (yes, meaning most of them were born in 1996) have been accepted to Wes through Early Decision, and they are now officially part of the Wesleyan community. Holla at all the prefrosh who are reading this post, and welcome to the Bestleyan.

Oh the little ED applicants.

Oh the little ED applicants.

As usual, however, no one really cares about the actual members of the class; we’re all in it for the WesAdmits 2018 page (which does in fact exist already!). Prefrosh who are reading this: Save yourself some awkwardness when you get to campus and know your WesAdmits etiquette.

  • About 70% of the upperclassmen on WesAdmits are totally trolling the shit out of you. When they say really random things things like, “All Wesleyan dorms are being equipped with froyo machines next year!”, they’re expecting you to be gullible. Last year one of my friends convinced an entire group of freshmen that Summerfields was getting a Starbucks express line.
  • Don’t talk about all the other colleges you were going to apply to. You got into Wesleyan ED; those other colleges don’t mean anything now. Stop trying to impress everyone with how you were going to apply to Brown ED but didn’t because you were too authentic for that Ivy League life.
  • Don’t post pictures of you holding your acceptance letter on WesAdmits. Some weird upperclassmen will turn it into their Facebook cover photo. Plus it just looks awkward.
  • Do NOT for the love of all that is Wesleyan friend request everyone in the WesAdmits Facebook group. It’s been two years since I got into Wesleyan, and to this day, every time my friends and I see the kid from my class year who friended 350+ Wes ED classmates back in December 2011, someone yells, “That’s the dude who friended all the people on WesAdmits!”

A Final Prefrosh Perspective on WesFest: “Simultaneously Excited and Terrified”

“I still can’t believe that I’ll be living there for the next four years, but I’m looking forward to the adventure.”

Here’s one final transmission from the Class of 2017 on experiencing WesFest last month, sent in by Cloie Logan ’17 of Albuquerque, New Mexico. For previous installments of this series, click here. Here’s Cloie:

I honestly don’t know what I was expecting at WesFest. Being an ED1 student, I guess I just really hoped that I wouldn’t spontaneously change my mind and decide I hated Wesleyan and be reserved to the fact that I’d be “stuck” here for the next year at least.

Thankfully, I was only reassured that Wesleyan was the place for me. President Roth’s welcome speech cancelled out all of the self-doubt sowed by some people back home who found it insane to be moving all the way out to Connecticut from Albuquerque, NM, and not even have a clue what I am going to study yet. But honestly, at this point I’d do anything to get out of this city.

Yet Another Prefrosh Perspective on WesFest: “Everybody Seemed So Optimistic”

“Unlike some colleges, there was no sense of a huge ‘stress’ cloud looming over the student body.”

Yet another prefrosh has written in to share some thoughts on the WesFest experience. For previous prefrosh perspectives, click here or here. Here’s Anna Lu ’17, an incoming freshman who first visited Wesleyan at the age of 12:

No words can properly describe Wesleyan. The first time I came to campus was at the age of 12 for my first championship swim meet. Being stuck at a swim meet for the entire day, I took the liberty to explore this mysterious college campus. As the years went by, I narrowed down the necessities of my future college: I’ve loved the idea of having a small liberal arts college in the northeast, an eclectic student body, and a strong science program. Wes fit that perfectly. I took a recruiting trip during the fall and that solidified all previous notions of it being my top choice.

Another Prefrosh Perspective on WesFest: “Stay Golden, Wes”

“Being on campus, surrounded by this incredible enthusiasm, and sometimes the necessary jadedness that comes with facilitating a community like this, was what really confirmed my decision to attend Wesleyan.”

Our second prefrosh perspective on WesFest comes from Molly Hastings ’17, a member of the Class of 2017 from Santa Cruz, California. If you’re a prefrosh and you want to write a guest post about WesFest, send it to us at staff(at)wesleying(dot)org. Here’s “Prefrosh Molly”:

My WesFest started out without a bang, as I waited in the San Jose airport for five hours due to air traffic delays. But my excitement rose as I lined up to board the plane, almost seeing Connecticut outside on the horizon, though it was another hour until I actually boarded the plane due to a missing first officer.

After a bumpy ride in, between a man who repeatedly offered me twizzlers and a woman who played Rat on a Scooter for what seemed like the entire flight, I arrived in Boston. It took me another two hours to actually get to Wesleyan, during which I hyped myself up by alternating between taking twenty-minute naps and reading my acceptance letter, feeling slightly confused.

A Prefrosh Perspective on WesFest: “Joining the Cult”

“I tried to look around myself more critically, and… shit, it was just as awesome a place I’ve always thought.”

The WesFest picnic on April 19. Photo via Olivia Drake and the Wesleyan Connection.

The WesFest picnic on April 19. Photo via Olivia Drake and the Wesleyan Connection.

This year, for the first time ever, we asked prefrosh to send in their impressions of WesFest for publication on Wesleying. Our first guest post comes from Chris Gortmaker ’17, an Early Decision prefrosh from Belmont, Massachusetts. Feel free to leave a comment, but don’t be an asshole. Here’s Chris:

Wesfest was awesome, but really, I wouldn’t have expected anything less. As an ED1 admit, I went to Wesfest without any doubts as to where I’d be spending my next four years. My decision was in, and my two-and-a-half days on campus did nothing but affirm my choice. The fellow prefrosh I met were consistently great people, and everything from Battle of the Bands at Eclectic to wine and cheese (the cheese notoriously absent) at WestCo kicked my ass with just how right it felt.

My sense of belonging stayed with me throughout, but was put somewhat into perspective at the Wednesday night comedy show in the Nics Lounge. A stand-up comedian whose name I forget—I do recall that he, in full police officer garb and brandishing a nightstick, endearingly harassed me later that night in WestCo—brought up an interesting point at the beginning of his act. He proclaimed that Wesleyan was in all respects the best school there was, and that all of us prefrosh present would be crazy not to choose Wes. I heard my own voice in his, as I had been saying things along these lines all day to the other prefrosh I met. Sarcasm began to creep into his voice as he exaggerated, blowing up his praise for Wesleyan to an absurd extent. He exclaimed, “Wow, what is this—a cult?”

Enormous Horde of Library Dwellers in Underwear Terrorizes Tiny Tour Group

“I can smell the people-in-their-underwear-ness.”

suggestive undiesThe practice of showing up in Olin Library’s Info Commons in one’s underwear on the Friday of WesFest, and trying especially hard to look studious and nonplussed, has become something of a time-honored tradition these days, and so has our practice of protecting the identity of all participants. This year’s, in my opinion, was particularly impressive. My little group—we had just gotten out of a class—ran over to Olin and, initially a little afraid to participate in the festivities, ran up to the third floor mezzanine and peered out the windows. We soon realized, however, that we were face-to-face with a group in that mezzanine’s symmetrical mate, and that the people there had indeed stripped down. We had no choice but to do so ourselves, except for one of our number who bailed on account of a “see-through” bra. Our reading selections included Lydia Davis‘s new chapbook about cows.