Tag Archives: anthropology

What Can You Do with Anthropology? Alumni Panel + Open House

Alumni Panel-1

From Professor Margot Weiss:

What can you do after graduation with a degree in Anthropology? Come hear four recent Wes Alumni talk about life after Wesleyan!

Friday, February 17, 2017
4:30 PM – 6:00 PM
Russell House
reception with snacks to follow — department faculty will also be on hand to answer questions about the major.

Featuring:
Mariama Eversley ’14, Embedded Historian Fellow for Blights Out in New Orleans
Promiti Islam ’08, National Training Specialist at the Posse Foundation in New York City
Michele Ko ’16, Government Relations Associate at Planned Parenthood of New York City
Katie McConnell ’13, Master of Environmental Science candidate at Yale’s School of Forestry

Contact Prof. Margot Weiss with any questions! Click here for more.

Date: Friday, February 17, 2017

Time: 4:30 PM – 6:00 PM

Place: Russell House

Announcing the 2015 GLASS Prize

Sophie Massey ’15 writes in:

The GLASS (Gay, Lesbian, and Sexuality Studies) Prize is awarded for the best research and writing on a subject in queer, trans, LGBT, or sexuality studies.
The prize is open to Wesleyan undergraduate students in all classes; senior essays and theses are preferred. The award includes no cash benefit, but the winner’s name will be published in the 2015 Commencement booklet.

Entries must be submitted in hard copy by 4pm on Monday, April 13 to the Center for the Americas (look for the bin labeled “GLASS Prize” in the downstairs hallway).
If you have any questions, please contact the GLASS Prize chair, Professor Margot Weiss: mdweiss[at]wesleyan[dot]edu
More information can be found here.

Submission deadline: Monday, April 13th at 4:00pm; entries must be submitted in hard copy at the Center for the Americas.

Opening Reception – “Personal Recollections: Gifts from Robert Dannin and Jolie Stahl”

maussFrom CFA staffer Andrew Chatfield:

Inspired by anthropological theories of gift-giving, Jolie Stahl and Robert Dannin recently donated a collection of 69 prints, photographs, and multiples to the Davison Art Center. The exhibition “Personal Recollections” will highlight this fascinating gift, which includes artwork from New York in the 1980s and 1990s, and iconic news photographs from members of the Magnum Photos cooperative.

The exhibition includes prints and multiples by Barbara Kruger, Richard Mock, and Kiki Smith, as well as photographs by Eve Arnold, Stuart Franklin, Steve McCurry, Nan Goldin, and Sebastião Salgado.

Date: Thursday, March 26
Time: 5-6 PM
Place: Davison Art Center

Mizrahi Mothers Wrapped in the Flag: Ultra-Nationalism, Apartheid, and the Divinity of Bureaucracy in Israel

Mizrahi Mother

Professor J. Kehaulani Kauanui writes in:

Israeli anthropologist Smadar Lavie will be delivering a talk about her new book, Wrapped in the Flag of Israel: Mizrahi Single Mothers and Bureaucratic Torture (Berghahn Books, 2014). The project explores the relationship between Mizrahi social protest movements in the State of Israel, violence in Gaza, protest movements in the surrounding Islamic World, and the possibility of further conflicts between Israel and the Palestinians, or Israel and its Arab neighbor states.

Smadar Lavie is a scholar in residence at the Beatrice Bain Research Group, UC Berkeley’s critical feminist research center, and is also a visiting professor at the Institute for Social Science in the 21st Century University College Cork. She is the author of The Poetics of Military Occupation, receiving the Honorable Mention of the Victor Turner Award for Ethnographic Writing, and co-editor of Displacement, Diaspora, and Geographies of Identity. She is the winner of the American Studies Association’s 2009 Gloria Anzaldúa Prize and the recipient of the 2013 “Heart at East” Honor Plaque for service on behalf of Mizrahi communities in the State of Israel.

This event is funded by the Department of Anthropology & Wesleyan Students for Justice in Palestine, and is co-sponsored by the Middle Eastern Studies program, along with the New Haven chapter of Jewish Voice for Peace.

This event is free and open to the public, and is wheelchair accessible.

  • Date: Tomorrow, Monday, November 17, 2014
  • Time: 4:30pm – 6:00pm
  • Place: Judd Hall, Rm. 116
  • Facebook: Event

Settler Colonialism in Hawai’i: A Panel Event

From Professor J. Kehaulani Kauanui:

The American Studies Department at Wesleyan University presents

Settler Colonialism in Hawai’i: A Panel Event

Introduction and moderation by J. Kehaulani Kauanui

Presentations:

“Staking Claim: Race and Indigeneity in Hawai’i,”Judy Rohrer

“Why Asian Settler Colonialism Matters: Thoughts on Critiques and
Debates,” Dean Itsuji Saranillio

stew/dent for ’em: PUSH: The Politicized Workings of Birth in America

The student forum train just keeps on rolling here at Wesleying. Since this definitely isn’t the first time I’ve felt like you could have a pretty wide-spanning education just on student forums (seriously: look at the master list), isn’t it about time someone hopped on raising the credit limit? Anyway. By the power of Hannah Cressy ’13, I give you FGSS420:

Introducing PUSH: The Politicized Workings of Birth in America (a spring student forum)

Birth is the largest healthcare cost in America, and the reason that most of us have already been hospitalized at least once.  Most of us will either make a baby or watch it happen during the next twenty years, yet most people remain uneducated on this nearly ubiquitous experience until they or their partners become pregnant.  This student forum will provide a space for examination of the history and politics of childbirth in America through a feminist/anthropological lens, with a focus on the medicalization of the birth process and its differing effects on populations according to race, class, location, language, disability, criminality, ethnicity, and sexuality, among other intersectional factors.  The class will meet once per week, and provide 1 credit in FGSS. Many documentaries, discussions, potlucks and field trips await!

Informational meeting: FRIDAY, JANUARY 25th at 4 PM in Espwesso Cafe.

Contact Hannah Cressy ’13 (hcressy@wes) or Kelsey Henry ’15 (khenry@wes) for more information.

Informational Meeting: Friday, January 25th
Time: 4 PM
Place: “Espwesso” “”Café””

Tonight: Interest/Planning Meeting for a Direct Action Class!

Happy Monday afternoon, studentfolk. For any of you looking to next semester in a desperate attempt to avoid paying much attention to the current one, you might be interested in the news to follow.

About a week ago, Maxwell Hellmann ’13 and Dan Fischer ‘11.5 sent out an email message asking if students might be interested in a course concerning direct action, activism at large, and the radical social theories associated with both. The idea seemed popular and many students expressed interest, especially in light of all that OccuPie stuff you may have heard about this semester.

At the moment, students are planning on basing much of the course off of a syllabus by the anthropologist and anarchist David Graeber, who taught a graduate seminar in “Direct Action and Radical Social Theory” his final semester at Yale.

To da best of my knowledge, this student forum is likely going to be taught under the official banner of the Anthropology department, though what makes up the bulk of the course is largely to be determined. Want to have a hand in that? Just interested in seeing if this is a course you might want to take? Skeptical that “direct action” even qualifies as action? Check out the meeting tonight – as numerous and wide a range of voices as possible would be appreciated.

Date: Today’s Date
Time: 11 P.M.
Place: UOC (190 High St., twixt Beta and Eclectic)

If you’re interested in a little more background or logistical information, click past the jump.