Tag Archives: drop add

Unofficial Orientation Series 2016: Drop/Add Tips and Tricks

This is an updated repost of Merry‘s 2014 post.

frustrated student at computer

This is part of our 2016 Unofficial Orientation Series. A quick reminder that you can check out the welcome post here and past years’ series here.

Disclaimer: While the tips introduced in this post can be applied universally, you should remember that your odds of getting into a class depend primarily not on your effort, but on the professor’s policies and how popular the class is. It’s pretty much impossible to convince a professor of an extremely popular class who simply won’t go over the limit to accept you into their class, even if you do everything right. But, trying can’t hurt, right?

Today’s installment of the Unofficial Orientation Series is mainly about the devil that is known as Drop/Add. If you don’t know what that is, the folks at the registrar’s office have provided this overview. During this period, students are able to add or drop pretty much any class to their schedule, regardless of the limits posed by pre-reg, such as class year distribution. I also highly recommend you check out this FAQ, also kindly prepared by the registrar’s office, as a way to get the basics down before proceeding. This post will not be doing much explaining of Drop/Add itself. It will, however, try to warn you, frosh, about the reality of this brutal race and offer some insights (read: randomly gathered knowledge that may have been the results of embarrassing behaviors of the author herself).

Blood Muscle Bone Course

If you’re looking for a cool interdisciplinary class to take during drop/add, consider checking this one out:bloodnbones

Blood, Muscle, Bone: The Anatomy of Wealth and Poverty

This fall, choreographers Jawole Willa Jo Zollar and Liz Lerman combine their artistic methods to teach students interested in bridging academic and artistic research in DANC374: Blood, Muscle, Bone: The Anatomy of Wealth and Poverty. Zollar and Lerman are asking new questions about how these conditions are defined and will explore issues surrounding wealth disparity and its impact on the body. This course is multi-disciplinary and will culminate in a performance-based teach-in. Guest faculty include: Bill Arsenio, professor of Psychology, Yeshiva University; Lois Brown, professor of African American Studies and English; and Wendy Rayack, associate professor of Economics.

Non-traditional course consisting of three weekend intensives. No dance experience required. Contact eroosbrown[at]wesleyan[dot]edu for PIO details.