Tag Archives: Egypt

Journey Through Palestine: A Brief History of a People in Conflict with Khaled Fahmy

Mariama Eversley ’14 writes in:

Come to hear about Palestinian conflict from the perspective of the Khaled Fahmy. Khaled Fahmy is professor and chair of the Department of History at the American University in Cairo. He is the author of several scholarly books on 19th century Egyptian social history, including All the Pasha’s Men: Mehmed Ali Pasha, His Army and the Founding of Modern Egypt (Cambridge University Press).

Date: Tuesday, May 1
Time: 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Place: PAC 002
Cost: Free

Judaism and Islam: Between History and Polemics

New professor alert! Elisha Russ-Fishbane will be joining Wesleyan’s Religion Department and Jewish and Israel Studies in July. If you can’t wait that long to hear about interactions between Judaism and Islam in medieval Egypt, check out this lecture tomorrow, details courtesy of Clare McGranahan ’13:

The talk will address Jewish approaches to Islam from a historical and modern perspective.

Elisha Russ-Fishbane received his Ph.D. from Harvard University in Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations in 2009. His dissertation, Between Politics and Piety: Abraham Maimonides and His Times, is a historical investigation into Egyptian Jewish society in the thirteenth century. It explores religious transformations of Egyptian Jewry, whose rituals and inner ideals reflect profound impact of contemporary Sufism, in the social and political context of contemporary transformations and upheavals in Egypt. Elisha Russ-Fishbane is now a Tikvah Postdoctoral Fellow in Jewish Thought at Princeton University and will be joining Wesleyan’s Religion Department and Jewish and Israel Studies in July.

Date: Thursday, April 19
Time: 4:30 pm
Place: PAC 004
Cost: Free

Middlebury Student taken captive in Syria; detained indefinitely

Despite the continuing coverage all over the CNN and HLN and whatever other newsy-outlet they blast over at Freeman, it is often the case that it is quite difficult to grasp the gravity of the chaos that’s ripping a new hole in the Middle East and North Africa right now. That is, until some shit closer to home hits the revolutionary fan.

On Thursday, the Burlington Free Press reported that a Middlebury student, Pathik “Tik” Root ’12, went missing in Damascus, Syria, where he was studying abroad.

Yesterday, the Burlington Free Press followed up by confirming that he has indeed been taken in and is being held by Syrian authorities. It is believed that he was rounded up when he was witnessing a demonstration that was taking place on March 18th at a “major mosque in the old city.” He has not been heard from since that date.

Details remain considerably sketchy at this time. More info after the jump.

Update [3/27]: On March 26th, confirmation has been given that Tik Root has been located and is believed to be safe and well. More info on the Middlebury page. Thanks to Leslie in the comments section for the tip!

Govt. Profs Rutland, Chenoweth on NYT

So this whole Revolution in the Middle East thing is shaping up to be not only a boon to liberal democracy (probably, hopefully, maybe?), but to publicity for good ol’ Wes as well.

Russia expert and Putin-meme connoisseur Peter Rutland (pictured on the right) has an op-ed up in the New York Times presenting the case of why what happened in Egypt and Tunisia will probably not happen in big, fluffy China. His op-ed was written in collaboration with one Orion Lewis, who – aside from having the first name I have now decided to bestow upon my firstborn – is a Government postdoctoral research associate here at Wesleyan. He co-coordinates the Program on Terrorism and Insurgency Research (PTIR), which as I talked about in an earlier post was started up by Govt. Prof. Erica Chenoweth back in 2008.

You can go clicky-clicky on the op-ed here.

Speaking of Prof. Chenoweth, she also has an op-ed up in NYT entitled “Give Peaceful Resistance a Chance,” which provides evidence that nonviolent uprisings actually succeed more often than violent uprisings, even against bat-shit-crazy regimes (see Mumu Gaddafi). She even preempts counterarguments by publishing counter-counterarguments on her personal website, which is pretty damn badass. As you can probably tell by now, I’m something of a Chenoweth fan-boy, and if such bad-assery doesn’t justify my fanboy-dom, I don’t know what kind of bad-assery will.

You can go to that one here, with the counter-counterarguments here.

[Thanks to Shoutbox Poster for the tip!]

I hope you guys are enjoying the break, because I’m here on campus enjoying the cold, cold weather.

WTF Dinner Meeting at Usdan, Feb. 15

You’ve probably (hopefully) heard about the Wesleyan Technology Front (WTF), not least because of our past coverage. Well, the resistance continues. An anonymous dispatch ‘?? writes in:

Food AND the Internet. What more could anyone possibly need? Come talk about how technology can improve life on campus, and how we can use it to help others.
P.S. Ask Egypt, this “Internet” shit works

Date:   Feb. 15
Time:   6:30 PM – 7:30 PM
Place:  Usdan 108

Also, mad props for the picture, WTF folks.

Making History: Perspectives on the Egyptian Uprising and the Wider Middle East, Feb 10th

A lot has happened in the past couple of weeks. Here’s a good opportunity to make sense of what went down, and what comes next:

“Making History: Perspectives on the Egyptian Uprising and the Wider Middle East”

All are welcome to listen and take part in a discussion on what will be an epochal moment of Middle Eastern history.

The panel includes Professor Bruce Masters (history), Professor Anne Peters (government), Muslim Chaplain Marwa Aly, and a student who spent last semester in Egypt.

Refreshments will be served!

Date:   Feb. 10
Time:   4:30 PM – 6:00 PM
Place:  PAC 001

Roosevelt Fireside Chat Policy Discussion Tuesdays

Joel Hochman ’13 writes in to holla:

The Roosevelt Institute welcomes the Wesleyan community to its weekly fireside chat! Come and discuss the week’s hottest issues.

This week: The Tea Party movement. How does its newfound success change the political landscape? What does its influence mean for Democrats? for Republicans? Is the movement even sustainable in the long term?

Also on the agenda: a continuation of last week’s discussion about the unrest in Egypt.

Date:   Feb. 8
Time:   8:30 PM – 9:30 PM
Place:  Usdan Couches

American students get the heck out of Egypt

As you may or may not know (and by golly I hope that you do), something big’s afoot in Egypt.

Following an explosion of protests in the Arab World (which Wikipedia now has a nifty all-encompassing entry on), the people of Egypt have taken to the streets since last Tuesday in search of political revolution – leaving a significant amount of damage and instability in their wake. Since then, students with Middlebury College’s program in Alexandria have been evacuated to the airport and are currently awaiting the next flight back to the States, according to the Brown Daily Herald. Kids studying with the American University in Cairo have also been evacuated.

Details after the jump.