Tag Archives: environmental justice

Wes Students Join Area Residents in Action Against Dakota Access Pipeline

“Our politicians are turning a blind eye to the protesters and to the native peoples as a new tyranny of oil is taking over our government” – Josh Nodiff ’19

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On Friday, September 9, Dragonfly Climate Collective, a local anti-capitalist environmental justice group, organized an action outside of TD Bank on Washington Street to protest the bank’s investment in the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL). Over 125 people from Wesleyan, Middletown, and greater Connecticut area turned out in response to a call for solidarity actions from the Camp of the Sacred Stones and the Red Warrior Camp, the two camps that have been leading the resistance against the DAPL. The Dragonfly Climate Collective report on the action can be found here.

Environmental Justice Art Exhibit

Plant puppetKatie Lowen ’19 writes in:

Hi! We are currently working on a project about the intersections of environmentalism and social justice. We want to look at how art can materialize the entanglement of humans and nature and the implications of that relationship as it is lived in our world.

Our goal is to create a collective art installation and gallery show to bring the Wesleyan community together. We are interested in how art can be used as a unifying force and to facilitate interactions between social justice/environmental activism, art focused on bridging gaps.

Art submissions should address the relationship between Environmental Issues and Social Justice; they can be in the form of drawings, paintings, music, spoken word, written pieces, expressive movement, anything that you feel expresses your ideas! For performance pieces or other types of artistic expression that cannot be sent through email, please submit a proposal. We hope that we can create a space for collaboration and coalition-building with different groups across campus as we build this collection together.

Please send submissions (either art or proposal for performance) to dtpope[at]wesleyan[dot]eduowon[at]wesleyan[dot]edu, or klowen[at]wesleyan[dot]edu. The deadline is April 8th! Our tentative dates for this gallery are 4/14 or 4/21 and location is TBA.

Submission Deadline: Friday, April 8

Food Justice, Sustainability, and Sovereignty at Wesleyan and Beyond Student Forum Interest Meeting!

cats-and-veggiesFrom Noelle Hiam ’15 and Rachel Lindy ’15:

Do you eat food? Ever wonder where your food comes from? Are you interested in animals rights and/or environmental or social justice? If so, come to the interest meeting for the Food Justice, Sustainability, and Sovereignty forum this Monday evening at 7:00. There will be free snacks.

Date: Monday, January 27
Time: 7 PM – 8:30 PM
Place: Usdan 108

Mountaintop Removal Awareness Festival

Are you MTR-aware? Zia Grossman-Vendrillo ’15 invites you to promote environmental justice:

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Humans are intimately connected with the physical topography of the Earth, whether it’s Foss Hill or Appalachian hills and river valleys.

On the evening of Thursday, April 25th, Foss Hill will be alive with drums, banjos, guitars, voices, stones on stones, fire, and resounding cries for justice from Appalachia. We will use these media to raise awareness about environmental and social destruction in coalfield communities from the practice of Mountaintop Removal (MTR) mining, as well as the dedicated movement to resist these forces.

The Wesleyan MTR-awareness crew will be joined by:

-Guest speaker Colin Bennett from 350.org (350CT) and organizer of
Mountain Justice
Morgan O’Kane, virtuoso banjo player, shouter and activist from
Virginia, now based in New York City, whose live performances are sure
to bring stomps, whooops, shakes and smiles
-Professors Michael Dorsey and Bill Johnston

Click past the jump for the full line-up.

Submit to this year’s Earth Week Zine

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Rachie Weisberg ’15, Becca Wilton ’15 and Ella Ross ’15 want you to submit to this year’s Earth Zine:

A zine is an awesome mini-magazine that allows students to voice their art/opinions/feelings/other synomyms for emotions about, well, anything. In accordance with last year’s Earth Zine, we are hoping this zine will become the new annual environmental publication on campus. Basically, it is an awesome and easy way to get your art published!

The theme for this year’s zine is Earth and Justice for All (or simply put: environmental justice). This theme was decided upon because it follows the Feet to the Fire theme for this year.

Feel free to submit anything – essays, photos, articles, haikus, doodles, – that you feel at all relates to this year’s theme. Whether you have a specific submission in mind or just have a question: feel free to contact Rachie at rweisberg(at)wesleyan(dot)edu. This year’s Earth week is from April 22 – 26 and so we are hoping to get the zine out by around them!

Contact: rweisberg@wes
Deadline: Soonish

Happening Pretty Much Now: Arts and Crafts for Climate Justice

Ally “Fuckin” Bernstein ’13 is warming up for her next Internet Club meeting with preparation for the Climate Justice
Circus:

Today at 1 pm, we’ll meet at the University Organizing Center 190 High Street in Middletown for an Arts & Crafts Day, Skit Rehearsal, and discussion of logistics in preparation for the Climate Justice Circus.

We’ll need as many supplies as possible for props and costumes,
including:

Signs and a “People’s Energy Plan” banner
Costumes for the following roles in the skit
2 Mimes
1 Magician making climate change disappear
1 Natural Gas Clown
1 Incineration Clown
1 Ringmaster
1 Elephant Handler

We are also looking for people to be in the skit. If you’re interested, please email If you would like to play a role in the skit, please email danfischer4@gmail.com!

Keystone XL Pipeline Protest Interest Meeting

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From Zach Burns ’14, Isabel Stern ’14, and Evan Weber ’13:

On Sunday, February 17, thousands of Americans will head to Washington, D.C. to make Forward on Climate the largest climate rally in history.

That means a fuckton of Wes-kids need to be there to make our voices heard and help the president start his second term with strong climate action by rejecting the Keystone XL Pipeline.

This is a big deal, and the more people we bring, the bigger it will be and the more fun we will have. Come to the UOC (University Organizing Center, between Beta and Eclectic) at 2pm on Sunday to find out all the deetz and make transportation and other logistical plans.

In 2009, sitting at a table with a bunch of young environmental organizers, President Obama told them: “Your job is to push me.” Unless we show him and the newly appointed Secretary of State John Kerry that lighting off one of the biggest carbon bombs in North America is a really, really, bad idea, he won’t have the political courage to reject this pipeline that climate activists, the media, and Congressional Republicans have turned into a huge political issue. So come to the meeting on Sunday, find out more about the action and the issues, and get pumped to move forward.

Date: Tomorrow, February 3rd
Time: 2pm
Place: University Organizing Center (between Beta and Eclectic)

First EON Meeting of the Semester

Save the Earth!

From your brand new EON coordinators Aletta Brady ’15, Nina Gerona ’15, Kate Gibble ’15 and Corey Guilmette ’13:

We are excited to announce that EON’s first meeting of the semester will be held this Friday, February 1st from 1-2PM in 41 Wyllys Room 114. That’s right, we’re back and ready for action.

EON (Environmental Organizers Network) is Wesleyan’s umbrella environmental group that helps organize environmental groups on campus to further promote their ideas. Our agenda for this meeting will be to introduce ourselves and give these various groups an opportunity to introduce themselves and their agendas for the upcoming year. If you want to get involved this is a great space to connect with other people who are interested in many different types of sustainability and Earth related issues. Also on the agenda will be a potential trip to Washington DC during the weekend of February 17th for a protest against the keystone pipeline.

This will also be an opportunity to bring up any relevant environmental issues that you see on campus and discuss a way to organize around them.

What: Environmental Organizers Network’s 1st meeting of the semester
Where: 41 Wyllys, room 114
When: This Friday from 1-2pm

Professor Yohe, Superstorm Sandy, Climate Change, and the Election

What we have been experiencing recently is only the harbinger of a future that will be punctuated by more severe weather extremes and increasing damage. —Gary Yohe, Professor of Economics

Wesleyan’s celebrity economics professor Gary Yohe has received much media coverage after releasing a rather troublesome report on Tuesday about Superstorm Sandy and climate change. Yohe, a senior member of the United Nations International Panel on Climate Change (which shared the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize with Al Gore), starts his report off with a laundry list of crazy climate events that have taken place globally in the past couple of years. He then claims that this isn’t “the new normal,” but rather “only the harbinger of a future that will be punctuated by more severe weather extremes and increasing damage—all driven as the future unfolds by past and future emissions of heat-trapping gases.” Yohe elaborates:

the changes in the current climate that have been observed across the planet are the products of only about 50 percent of the warming to which we have already committed ourselves with our past emissions. This means that the planet would warm another 2 to 4 degrees Fahrenheit through the middle of this century even if concentrations of heat-trapping gases were to achieve their maximum tomorrow — not likely, since sustaining a specific concentration starting tomorrow would require an 80 percent reduction in emissions overnight.

Basically, we’re fucked.

Discussion with Prof. Stewart: Big Finance and Environmental Justice

Ross Levin ’15 writes in about “Bank of America,” a pressing new release by avant-garde Wesleyan band Chilly Phoenix a discussion taking place at 200 Church:

Join students and faculty at 200 Church on Tuesday at 4:15 PM for an open discussion on the troubled relationship between the American finance industry and the environment, facilitated by Professor Brian Stewart. What role does the finance industry currently play in climate change, pollution, and other environmental problems? Can the finance industry be reformed to play a positive role in moving towards a sustainable economy? What can we, as students, do to speed up this process?

This is part of Bank Transfer Week, a series of events leading up to Bank Transfer Days on Thursday, Friday, and Monday, when representatives from local credit unions will be on campus to help students start accounts and leave the big banks behind. In addition to the Inside Job screening last week and this discussion and the Bank Transfer Days, we will be having a march to the local branch of Bank of America to let them know we don’t want our money supporting their corrupt practices–stay tuned for more info on that, and for more information on Bank of America, look at the links below:

Date: Tuesday, April 24
Time: 4:15 pm
Place: 200 Church
Cost: $15 in monthly fees from Bank of America