Tag Archives: ethics

Ethics and Transparency in Managing Wesleyan’s Endowment

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PSA from Joel Michaels ’18:

The Committee for Investor Responsibility is hosting a panel open to all Wesleyan community members that will address the University’s endowment. Panelists will discuss how ethical considerations factor into investment decisions and choosing external managers.

President Roth will introduce the event and discuss the role of Wesleyan’s endowment in supporting academic programs and financial aid. The panel will feature Anne Martin, Wesleyan’s Chief Investment Officer, alongside Gil Skillman, Wesleyan Professor of Economics, and Noah Markman ’13, a Wesleyan alum who now works in the area of responsible investing. After presentations by the panelists, the space will be opened for questions from the audience.

Date: Thursday, November 5th
Time: 7:00 PM
Place: PAC 001

Symposium: Archaeology and Politics

From Ali Rosenberg ’15:

Come to the Archaeology and Politics Symposium featuring:

  • Epistemology and Ethics of an Activist Science at the African Burial Ground (Michael Blakey, College of William and Mary)
  • The Role of Archaeology and Community: The Shared Past of Israelis and Palestinians in the Present (Ann E. Killebrew, Pennsylvania State University)
  • The Politics of Naming and Knowing: Repatriation and Indigenous Identity (Dorothy Lippert, Smithsonian Museum)
  • The Politics of Protection (and Destruction) of Archaeological Sites in Contemporary India (Carla M. Sinopoli, University of Michigan)

Sponsored by the Allbritton Center for the Study of Public Life, the Archaeology Program, the Government Department, and Jewish and Israel Studies.

Date: Friday, November 8
Time: 1:30 PM – 5:00 PM
Place: Allbritton, Room 311

Judith Butler Unpacks the Bejeezus Out of Zionism at Memorial Chapel

“You’ve all been very good. I’m sorry, I’m a bit traumatized.”

Neither snow nor ice nor free speech restrictions could stop her: as planned, Judith Butler, famed Professor of Rhetoric and Literature at University of California Berkeley, spoke in Memorial Chapel yesterday to a full-capacity crowd about the writings of philosopher Martin Buber and the promise they may hold for reinstating open dialogue about peace in the Middle East.

Butler was introduced by President Roth, who pointed out that she embodied the Wesleyan mission statement to a tee as a practitioner of  “courageous responsibility, which is difficult to carry out to the street and back to the academy.” Professor of Anthropology and American Studies Margot Weiss, who provided background on her for a few minutes afterward, was greeted by a enthusiastic wave of applause when she rose to the stage. Realizing what had happened due to her faintly resembling Butler, she shouted, “I am not Judith Butler, but thank you!” She went on to draw connections between Butler’s current work and the work on gender that she is best known for, saying that her most recent book, Parting Ways, sees Judaism as a kind of “anti-identitarian project.”

Butler’s approach to critiquing Israeli policies was so carefully measured and focused on separating the Jewish people from the idea of the Jewish state that she paused halfway through to assure people she wasn’t a robot. She also thanked the audience for their patient listening and respect for her views, saying, “You’ve all been very good. I’m sorry, I’m a bit traumatized.” Laughter ensued.

The PETA Debate: Is Eating Meat Ethical?

From Dylan Turmeque ’13:

Have you ever sneered at the vegan section of Usdan as you waited in line for your Philly cheese steak? Have you ever felt an overwhelming sense of guilt when you realized you enjoyed your breakfast sandwich a little too much?

Whatever the reason, The Woodrow Wilson Debate Society invites you to come by and devour the verbal feast that will occur when we takes on Bruce Friedrich of PETA on whether eating meat is ethical.

Be prepared to leave filled with information that may make you reconsider your eating habits, or affirm them!

See you there!

Date:   April 16
Time:   1:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Place:  200 Church