Tag Archives: Film Studies

Film Diversity Town Hall Meeting

From Film Majors, Minors and Prospective Film Studies Students:

Please join us this Thursday, April 27th at 5:30pm in Judd Hall Room 116 to discuss diversity within the Film Department. This will be a public meeting open to the entire student body and faculty. In this meeting we hope to reiterate our suggestions for diversity and announce our plans for moving forward. We then hope to open the meeting up to discussion from attendees. Our main goal of this meeting is to gain a clearer understanding of the department’s initiatives to achieve diversity and for us to be able to publicly and candidly clarify our own hopes for the future of diversity within the film department. We hope for this discussion to be a meeting with multiple points of view, so please encourage your friends and faculty members to participate. This open discussion will lead to mutual understanding and change for the better.

See you there!

Link to Facebook event

Date: Thursday, April 27
Time: 5:30-7PM
Place: Judd Hall Room 116

AWARENESS 2017: America Divided film screening

You’re invited to a film screening:

America Divided: Out of Reach and The Class Divide is a series of documentaries focusing on inequalities in the United States as presented by high profile correspondents. America Ferrera, the daughter of immigrants, explores the ways refugees and immigrants are treated in Texas. Jesse Williams examines effects of the school-to-prison pipeline on students and the community in St. Petersburg, Florida. This is the last film in the AWARENESS 2017 Film Series.

The film starts at 8, and admission is free!

Date: Tuesday, April 18th – tonight!
Time: 8:00 p.m.
Place: Center for Film Studies

Zero Days film screening

Zero Days, from director Alex Gibney, investigates the malware Stuxnet, which the US and Israel unleashed on an Iranian nuclear facility, and which spread beyond the intended target. The film is a startling look at the future of digital warfare.

Part of the ongoing AWARENESS 2017 Film Series.

Admission is free!

Date: Tuesday, February 28th
Time: 7:00 p.m.
Place: Center for Film Studies

Wesleyan Film Senior Theses: 16mm, Digital, and Animation

Sarah Chrystler ’13 writes in:

Come to the best film series night of the year – senior theses! There are two programs this year: 16mm and Digital films on Friday, May 8th at 8:00 pm and Sunday, May 10th at 2:00 pm; and Digital and Animation films on Saturday, May 9th and Sunday, May 10th, both at 8:00 pm.
Tickets will cost $5 and go quickly – make sure to get there early to save a seat! Tickets will go on sale 45 minutes before each show.

Dates and times:
16mm and Digital films: Friday, May 8th at 8:00pm; and Sunday, May 10th at 2:00pm
Digital and Animation films: Saturday, May 9th at 8:00pm; and Sunday, May 10th at 8:00pm
Place: Goldsmith Family Cinema, Center for Film Studies
Cost: $5

Criticism Now! A Conversation on the State of the Art

AO-ScottFrom Sarah Chrystler ’13:

Come hear A. O. Scott, Distinguished Professor of Film Criticism at Wesleyan and a chief film critic at The New York Times moderate a discussion about the state of criticism today with panel guests Laura Miller, journalist and book critic, co-founder of Salon.com, and author of The Magician’s Book: A Skeptic’s Adventures in Narnia; Wesley Morris, film critic for Grantland, former critic for The Boston Globe, and 2012 Pulitzer Prize winner in criticism; and Emily Nussbaum, television critic for The New Yorker, and 2014 ASME winner for Best Columns and Commentary.

Date: Tuesday, November 11
Time: 8 PM
Place: Center for Film Studies, Goldsmith Family Cinema

History/Theory and Screenplay Presentations

url-4From Emily Brown ’12:

Can’t get enough of film? Want something to tide you over now that the Film Series has closed its doors for the year? Love presentations? The Film Department would like to invite you to our History/Theory and Screenplay Presentations.

5pm–History/Theory Presentation
6pm–Reception
7pm–Screenplay Presentations

Date: Tues, May 6
Time: 5-9 p.m.
Place: Center for Film Studies

An Interview with Film Studies Department Head, Professor Jeanine Basinger

“You’re having conversations about movies and about the work and about questions and disagreements… there’s so much that grows out of that so when someone graduates you’re not through talking to them yet about it all.”

Basinger is here pictured in the Goldsmith Family Cinema. This picture was taken from New York Times Article featuring her book "The Star Machine," about the height of the studio system in the 30s through 50s

Basinger is here pictured in the Goldsmith Family Cinema. This picture was taken from a New York Times Article featuring her book The Star Machine, about the height of the studio system in the 30s through 50s [Source].

As a newly admitted film major, one can imagine the anx-citement surrounding this interview. Jeanine Basinger, who is on record as “one of the most important film scholars alive today” and who built Wesleyan’s world renowned film program from the bottom up, is a name I have learned to revere since day one as a prospective film student. At the scheduled time, I dialed Professor Basinger’s office to be greeted with enthusiasm and an eagerness to get right to business. She expressed her hope that her husband would bring her a cup of coffee amidst her busy workday and we jumped right into the questions. She made the interview very easy for me, answering with depth and segue-ing effortlessly into questions I hadn’t even asked yet. We discussed the establishment of the College of Film and the Moving Image, which was announced just over a year ago, the liberal arts approach to cinema, and her relations with past film majors. By the end of the half hour, I was feeling reenergized, inspired, and more excited than ever to begin my journey as a Wesleyan University film major with Professor Basinger as a guide.

The following is the transcript of our interview, edited for clarity.

Could you tell me about the College of Film and the Moving Image – why the initiative was taken on and what differences it brings to the department?

The interesting thing is that all of the components that make up the college are things that we have in fact been doing for years. The designation of making it into the college is less of a change and more of a recognition of what we are and what we do.

Film Critic A.O. Scott to Teach Course on Film Criticism

A.O. Twitter selfie

We somehow missed this in our Courses of Interest Spring 2014 post, but NY Times co-chief film critic A.O. Scott is teaching a course called “The Art of Film Criticism” next semester. This was verified by President Michael Roth’s Facebook status:

Screen Shot 2013-11-17 at 4.02.24 PM

The course requires a POI (granted by the Film Studies Dept Chair Jeanine Basinger) and is open only to film majors, so you probably won’t be taking it. The description of the course:

This course will consider film criticism as a literary genre and an intellectual discipline, with the goal of helping students develop strong writerly voices and aesthetic points of view. Readings will include important critics of the past–including James Agee, Andrew Sarris, Pauline Kael and Susan Sontag–and examples of criticism as it is currently practiced, with special attention to digital media. Writing assignments will focus on the techniques and challenges of analyzing complex works of art concisely and on deadline.

Film Studies Minor Open House Information Session

The Film Studies Department has yet another enticement, as if one is needed, to enter the high-stakes world of Film at Wesleyan:

On Monday, December 3rd at 8 PM the Film Studies Department will be holding an Information Session to introduce students to the new Minor being offered in Film Studies. We would like to invite all interested students to attend and look forward to meeting all those who choose to come!

Date: Tonight, December 3rd
Time: 8pm
Place: Center for Film Studies

Audition for a Senior Thesis Film

From Kaitlin Lee ’13:

You should totally try out for this! I think you would be good at it. You don’t need to bring anything, you don’t need to memorize anything, you don’t need to wear anything special. Just come! Why are you doubting yourself. That’s lame don’t do that. I think you should at least come out. It’ll be good for you! Putting yourself out there and everything. I’m proud of you already! It’ll be quick, real quick. I promise. Just try out! It’ll be so much fun!

It’ll be at Usdan 110 on Wednesday at 5pm to 7pm. You should just do it, I mean it won’t kill you or anything.

Anyways, I believe in you.

Date: Wednesday, October 10
Time: 5-7 pm
Place: Usdan 110