Tag Archives: Gallery

(Re) Presenting Place: A Portrait of the Coal River Valley

 

Update! Gallery opening has been rescheduled to Tuesday, February 24th, from 5:30-7 with a talk at 6pm. Sorry for any confusion. 

In the Summer of 2013, Rachel Lindy ’15, Rachie Weisberg ’15 and Isaac Silk ’14 spent six weeks living in the Coal River Valley of southern West Virginia—an area highly affected by mountaintop removal coal mining and teeming with activist resistance. During this time, they developed a multimedia project that explored the future of the region and its inhabitants in a post-coal economy, attempting to place this change in the larger context of social and environmental justice issues. By sharing these images and stories, they hope to provide the Wesleyan community with a sense of the deep complexities surrounding the coal industry, and to encourage dialogue around the often absentminded nature with which we consume fossil fuels.

The opening reception is in Zelnick this Monday from 4:30-6pm with a talk by Rachel and Rachie at 5 pm and the gallery will be up until the 27th.

Exhibition made possible through the generosity of the COE’s Visualizing the Environment Program, the COE, the Green Fund, and the CFA’s Feet to the Fire Program.

When: February 24th from 5:30-7pm, talk at 6pm. Gallery is open through the 27th.
Where: Zelnick Pavillion
Cost: Free!

“A Body in Fukushima”

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Straight from Andrew Chatfield:

“A Body in Fukushima” is a haunting series of color photographs and videos presented in a groundbreaking exhibition across all three of Wesleyan’s galleries. Last year, dancer-choreographer Eiko Otake and photographer-historian William Johnston followed abandoned train tracks through desolate stations into eerily vacant towns and fields in Fukushima, Japan. Following the 2011 earthquake and tsunami, the explosions of the Daiichi nuclear plant made the area uninhabitable. Sometimes in vulnerable gestures and at other times in a fierce dance, Ms. Otake embodies grief, anger, and remorse. Mr. Johnston’s crystalline images capture her with the cries of the Fukushima landscapes. “By placing my body in these places,” she says, “I thought of the generations of people who used to live there. I danced so as not to forget.” A project of witness, remembrance, and empathy, “A Body in Fukushima” grapples with the reality of human failure. As Mr. Johnston writes, “By witnessing events and places, we actually change them and ourselves in ways that may not always be apparent but are important.”

William Johnston is Professor of History and East Asian Studies at Wesleyan, and Eiko Otake is Visiting Artist in the Dance Department and the College of East Asian Studies.

Locations/Dates:

South Gallery, Erza and Cecile Zilkha Gallery, 283 Washington Terrace, Middletown, Connecticut
Tuesday, February 3 through Sunday, March 1, 2015
Tuesday-Sunday, Noon-5pm

Davison Art Center, 301 High Street, Middletown, Connecticut
Tuesday, February 3 through Thursday, March 5, 2015
Tuesday-Sunday Noon-4pm

College of East Asian Studies Gallery at Mansfield Freeman Center, 343
Washington Terrace, Middletown, Connecticut
Tuesday, February 3 through Sunday, May 24, 2015
Tuesday-Sunday, Noon-4pm
Closed Friday, March 6 through Tuesday, March 24, 2015

Date: February 3rd through May 24th
Place: Across all three of Wesleyan’s Galleries!
Cost: Free!

Opening Reception “Picture/Thing”

From Andrew Chatfield:

“Picture/Thing” presents ten artists—Kendall Baker, Isidro Blasco, Rachel Harrison ‘89,Leslie Hewitt, Jon Kessler, Anouk Kruithof, Marlo Pascual, Mariah Robertson, Erin Shirreff, and Letha Wilson—who make hybrid objects that challenge the limits of photography and sculpture at a time when the definitions of the two media continue to evolve. These artists take varying approaches to material, technology, and presentation, expanding and redrawing the traditional perimeters of both. Defying photography’s specificity as a “window onto the world,” some prioritize the materiality of the photograph over the actual image, while others migrate the graphic flatness of the photograph into the full dimensionality of the sculptural realm. Undoubtedly a response to the immateriality and infinite reproducibility of digital technology, the surveyed works insist on both the physical presence and uniqueness associated with sculpture, and the indexical relationship to the physical world exemplified by photography, resulting in a new formulation: a picture/thing.

Opening reception: Thursday, January 29, 2015 from 5pm to 6:30pm with talk by the curators at 5:30pm

Gallery Hours: Tuesday through Sunday, Noon to 5 pm from January 29 to March 1

Date: Tomorrow, January 29
Time: 5-6:30 PM
Place: Zilkha Gallery

Lecture with Artist Mary Heebner

In the multi dimensional installation Silent Faces/Angkor, Mary Heebner knits together imagery and writing to create an elemental, spiritual and involving interpretation of the myths of the ancient Angkor temple complex that plays on the links she has found between human and geographic forms.

Mary Heebner often turns to myth to broaden her understanding of the bonds between humans and the earth. When she went to Cambodia’s Angkor temple complex in 2000 and 2001, she began a series she called geography of a face to further her exploration of the connection between human and geographic form. Through both drawing and photography she engaged Angkor Wat’s twelfth century frieze, the Churning of the Sea of Milk and the other sculptural works there. While humans have always carved likenesses in stone, those figures just as surely erode and return to the earth. The ancient myth she studied and the eroded faces she read as maps shaped her path to creation of the books, scroll paintings, drawings and texts that make up this striking and profound installation.

Mary Heebner is an internationally known painter, book artist, writer, publisher, and installation artist with works in public and private institutions including the Library of Congress, National Gallery of Art, The British Library, New York Public Library, The J. P. Getty Research Library, Dartmouth College, the University of California and Stanford University.

When: Monday, April 7, 4:30pm-6:00pm
Where: Mansfield Freeman Center for East Asian Studies Gallery

Photos: Precision Troupe Performance

This week’s edition of “Mike Nakhla ’13 Takes Some Pretty Excellent Photos and We Lazily Repost Them For You” features the April 19 dance performance by Precision Troupe, one of Wesleyan’s oldest dance companies, which performs once a year in a party setting. These shots were taken at Psi U.

For more of Nakhla’s work, click here or check out his website. He does weddings! Get engaged so you can hire him! Get engaged to him!

Be The Art Gallery Opening at Zilkha South Gallery

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Imagine a place where magic happens. Where the miracle of human expression manifests itself in varying dimensions and perspectives onto four stark white gallery walls. Don’t worry, this place exists. And it starts existing tomorrow:

Olivia Grant ’14, Sydney Lowe ’13  and Yatta Zoker ’14 want you to come to the BE THE ART Gallery Opening Reception!

BE THE ART is an annual student-curated art exhibition committed to celebrating and raising awareness of underrepresented artists of color at Wesleyan.
Featured Artists include: Heran Abate ’13 , Dandara Catete ’15, Taylor Dauphin ’15, Raphael Diallo ’14, Mariama Eversley ’14, Adam Forbes ’13, Raphael Linden ’15, Sophia Hussain ’13, Christian Lalonde ’13, Sydney Lowe ’13, Mao Misaki ’15, Marina Reza ’13, Khari Slaughter ’13, Lisa Sy ’13, Ariana Todd ’13, Dat Vu ’15, Yiyang Wang ’15

Refreshments will be provided by Iguanas Ranas. Fxwrk (Coral Foxworth) will provide beats. Wes Alum Kamar Thomas ’12 will be speaking!

When: Thursday, February 21st
Where: Zilkha South Gallery
Time: 5-7 pm
Why: The magic waits for no one.

EcoMusic Competition

From Sewon Kang ’14:

Calling all environmentally conscious & musically gifted friends!

Submit to an EcoMusic competition hosted by COE, Music, and CFA that centers around environmental issues/themes seen in the exhibition FOOD-WATER-LIFE, currently in the Zilkha Gallery. We are looking for proposals for creative and passionate music that addresses these issues so please consider submitting! You could win $200!!! YAY! Proposals due 3/1/13.

See below for guidelines.

Opening Reception for Passing Time

Submitted by Stratton Coffman ’14:

Join us for the opening of Passing Time, the new show in the Zilkha Gallery, on view from now through Sunday, March 4, 2012. The exhibition is organized by the Center for the Arts and curated by Ginger Gregg Duggan and Judith Hoos Fox of c2—curatorsquared. There will be a gallery talk during the opening reception at 5:30pm by Ms. Fox and artists Stefana McClure and Siebren Versteeg.

The multiple and converging meanings of the phrase “passing time”–spending time, time to die–are explored in the evocative imagery of recent art by fourteen international artists working in video, photography, sculpture and works on paper. Some artists turn to sport, some to music; some refer to nature and its rhythms to explore concepts of time-short term, long term and terminating. Others partner with time itself in their making of art. Time is a concept that philosophers and physicists ponder. Time provides a framework that orders, measures and defines. We spend time, we waste it, we keep it; time flies, it drags. It is elastic in its perception-long when we are young, gaining momentum as we age. This exhibition explores the relationship between the time of our life and the time of the eons.

The exhibit features works by Rineke Dijkstra (The Netherlands), Shaun Gladwell (Australia), Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Stefana McClure and Bill Viola (United States), among others.

Date: Jan. 31
Time: 5:00 PM – 7:00 PM
Place: Ezra and Cecile Zilkha Gallery
Cost: Free