Tag Archives: garage rock

BandCampWes: O Presidente Deals With the Real By Tapping Into Music Past

Clube De Futebol

It would be wrong of me to say that O Presidente plays music from another time.  That’s simply missing the point.  While the band, comprised of Andrew Zingg ’13, Nathaniel Draper ’12, Tobias Butler ’13, and Thomas Yopes (UC Berkeley ’13), writes music with very particular and sometimes peculiar influences, they’re not really reaching back into the past to steal sounds.  Rather, their debut album Clube De Futebol collapses the past 60 years of music history into 10 succinct songs and adds their own, very 21st century sense of humor right on top.

A quick taste of that humor:  According to lead singer Zingg, the band formed around a failed student group that he and guitarist Draper attempted to start during his freshman year.  Clube de Futebol, originally, was the proposal for “this club that would get SBC funds to pay for a TV and the Fox Soccer channel so we could get together with our friends and watch soccer. The Portuguese spelling was an homage to Brazil’s beautiful way of playing the game.  Needless to say, SBC never agreed to give us any money.  But the name stuck.”  The band name, O Presidente, was a product of the same failed Clube—it was Draper’s official title, in Portuguese of course.

That’s not the last bit of Brazillian influence you’ll hear on this record.  On the 50s throwback “Take My Baby,” the group sings its final verse in—you guessed it—Portuguese.  You’ve got to give these guys credit for continuity.  That song is notable for its American inspiration as well.  Beginning with a classic slide into an upbeat surf-guitar riff, “Take My Baby” is a concise tune with easy-to-place roots.

Ty Segall Breaks Hearts, Bass Drums, Vocal Mics, More Hearts

Three cheers for Ty Segall, the San Fran-based one-man-band garage-rocker who, despite a broken bass drum pedal and myriad other technical difficulties, brought love, sweat, and Black Sabbath covers to the Eclectic dining room last night.

Forget Segall’s latest, 2011’s sludgy if uncharacteristically restrained Goodbye Bread. Even without a backing band, Segall’s live show is a hell of a lot less hinged, cycling—unaccompanied—through solo originals, Black Sabbath’s “Paranoid,” and that one screaming blues cover that I think maybe is in Goodfellas (help, guys?) with equal abandon. Ty’s bass drum crashed, but the audience filled in graciously. All in all, way to kick off 2012’s freakish concert lineup. (More on this soon.) (Sadly, I missed Featherwood Bee, but post your impressions/photographs/videofilms/love notes/ransom letters in the comments.)

Images below—click on for an appropriately dark and muddy video clip, so you too can party like it’s 2001.

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