Tag Archives: Humanities

Best of WesMaps: Spring 2015 Edition

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Spring 2015 PreRegistration is open, meaning it’s 2+ weeks of fretting—mostly for frosh, but it’s no treat for everyone else, either. WesMaps takes in your feelings, your worries, your hopes, your dreams, your prerequisites, and it spits them out into a nonsensical schedule as if to say, I am a roulette of chance and class hierarchy and you shall bow to my authority.

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So to help everyone out in their quest, I’ve been going around looking for the weirdest/most liberal arts/funniest course names and descriptions on WesMaps. Just remember, just because it sounds stupid doesn’t mean it’s not the most awesome and fascinating class you might ever take—take that from a guy who was in “Exotic Latin Corporealities” (LAST 213, Spring 2013).

Disclaimer: As with everytime we do this sort of post, the classes are heavily weighted in the Humanties and Social Sciences categories, because, as hard as you try, you won’t get far on laughs with “Molecular Biophysics Journal Club II.” If you see anything that is noteworthy that I didn’t include here, put it in the comments!

Romance Languages and Literatures Fall Open House

Scarlett Perry ’15 invites prospective majors to an RL&L Department Open House:

Would you like your undergraduate major to help you:

· Acquire familiarity with another culture on that culture’s terms?
· Acquire the kind of linguistic and cross-cultural proficiency required for 21st-c. life and careers?
· Put you into deep and meaningful contact with some of the most rewarding literary, cinematic, and visual texts ever created?
· Explore the past as it unfolds in France and the Francophone world, Italy, and Spain and the Hispanophone world, including Latin America?
· Incorporate study abroad as a key component of your studies at Wesleyan?

Pizza will be served. If you are contemplating a major in one of our programs but cannot attend the information session on October 28, please contact the appropriate major representative:

French Studies: Jeff Rider (jrider[at]wesleyan[dot]edu)

Italian Studies: Antonio González (agonzalez[at]wesleyan[dot]edu)

Hispanic Literature and Cultures: Octavio Flores (oflores[at]wesleyan[dot]edu)

Romance Studies: Michael Armstrong-Roche (marmstrong[at]wesleyan[dot]edu)

Date: Monday, October 28
Time: 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM
Place: 300 High Street

Pyxis call for submissions

Pyxis

Courtesy of Ben Zucker ’15:

“It is a happy talent to know how to play.” — Ralph Waldo Emerson

In life, we make the distinction between work and play as a means of structuring our everyday activity, but what exactly does it mean to play? How does play relate to games? Typically, the idea of game has been expressed in virtual spaces of rules which help to shape our conception of society’s structure through experience and experimentation. But we do not only play within the confines of games, nor do we consider all games playful. Pyxis, Wesleyan’s journal for the humanities, is interested in seeing how different disciplines and approaches in the humanities have explored and critiqued the notion, interpretations, and intersections of games and play.

Topics include, but are not limited to:

Pyxis Call for Submissions: “Memory”

wordcloud_memory_finalClaire Seoin Choi ’13 is calling all writers and artists:

“Remembrance of things past is not necessarily the remembrance of things as they were.” — Marcel Proust

What does it mean to remember, or to forget? In his chef d’oeuvre In Search of Lost Time, Marcel Proust questions how one remembers and accesses memory. Proust, however, is not alone in this exploration. Many other scholars have delved into the topic of memory and investigated its importance in social organization, historical construction, and personal and group narratives. This semester, Pyxis invites you to contribute your academic work on this theme. Topics may include, but are not limited to:

How do we express memory in literature, in visual form, in performance? How do the stories we tell ourselves–through narratives, myths, or collective memories–structure the world around us? How is memory constructed, recorded, represented, manipulated?

PYXIS Shows you Their “Bodies”


Claire Choi ’13 wants you to take a look:

PYXIS is Wesleyan’s new journal for the humanities, and after many meetings, e-mail exchanges, paper readings, editing, and  much caffeine and sugar, our first digital issue, “Bodies” is out! Check out amazing academic papers and artwork from fellow Wes students. You can also like our Facebook page and follow us on Twitter to keep in touch. Enjoy!

Date: Today
Time: Already & Now
Place: pyxisjournal.com

Pyxis Call for Submissions: “Bodies”

Pyxis, Wesleyan’s only interdisciplinary humanities journal, has a pretty sweet compendium of corporeal lexicon for your perusal. It also wants you to submit your academic writing related to their theme of BODIES.

Bodies. We all have one. Or do we? What is a body?

Body: (n) The complete physical form of a person or animal; the assemblage of parts, organs, and tissues that constitutes the whole material organism.

Body: (v) To give form, shape, or physical presence to; to embody.

While these are two definitions of “body,” the body, as a concept, has many more connotations. Scholars, for example, have discussed the ways in which the body figures into politics, religion, philosophy (e.g., mind/body dualism), performance, visual art, and science. Pyxis, a new undergraduate journal for the humanities, is interested in seeing how different disciplines and approaches in the humanities have defined, criticized and challenged the notion and interpretations of bodies.

New Journal for the Humanities: Info Meeting & Call for Editors

From Aria Danaparamita, Claire Choi, Ka Ya Lee, and Yu Vongkiatkajorn:

So we were sitting there contemplating infinity when we thought, why is there not a student-run academic journal for the humanities? Answer: because we’re going to start one! (That makes no sense, whatever.)

We are starting this new journal for the humanities (pending a more attractive name…) in partnership with CHUM. Here’s the plan: a journal published periodically, in print and online, with peer-reviewed academic work from any of the humanities, surrounding one common theme.

And you should be involved. Ways to be involved:
– editorial team
– print layout/production
– online/media team

We’d like to have the most diverse team possible in terms of interests and disciplines (even if you don’t have a major yet!). We’d also like to have people who’ve had experience in publications on campus. Or anyone who thinks this is a good idea, really.

Lecture: Connecticut in the American Civil War

From Library Assistant Jennifer Hadley:

On Wednesday, April 20th at 7:00 p.m., Dr. Matthew Warshauer, Professor of History at Central Connecticut State University and co-chair of the Connecticut Civil War Commemoration Commission, will discuss his new book, Connecticut in the American Civil War: Slavery, Sacrifice and Survival (Wesleyan University Press), as well as the plans that are underway for the state’s 150th anniversary of the war.  Although most may not immediately think of Connecticut when considering the Civil War, the state was extensively involved  in the conflict.   Connecticut sent more than 30 regiments to the front, had an extensive industrial capacity, and an active home front.  Connecticut is also home to more than 130 Civil War monuments.  The lecture will take place in the Develin Room, 2nd floor, Olin Memorial Library, 252 Church Street, Middletown.

From 6:30-7:00 and again after the lecture, Suzy Taraba, Head of Special Collections & Archives and University Archivist,  will host an open house viewing of the Samuel Proal Hatfield Civil War Photograph Album and other selected items related to the Civil War in the Davison Rare Book Room, Special Collections & Archives (1st floor Olin).