Tag Archives: intern

Apply to be the CFA’s ICPP intern!

From the CFA:

Apply to be the CFA’s ICPP intern! The Institute for Curatorial Practice in Performance is Wesleyan’s low-residency Master’s program in the curation of performance. ICPP is looking for an intern that will work this summer, and two weekends during the academic year, to provide support for the program. Tasks include: providing logistical support, serving as a course assistant, as well as researching and archiving. The intern is invited to attend all performances, lectures, talks and meals outside of class times.

More information about the position included in the link. Applications are available on Career Drive, due April 15th.

Apply on CareerDrive By: Friday, April 15
More Information

Volunteer with the Center for Prison Education

From Molly Rappaport ’15 and Shannon Nelson ’14:

Interested in volunteering with Wesleyan’s college in prison program as a Tutor or Research Intern? The Center for Prison Education is currently accepting applications for Tutor and Research Intern positions during the spring semester!

Come to the Wesleyan Center for Prison Education Student Group’s general interest meeting this Tuesday at 9:00 pm in the OCS lounge to learn about the program and discuss future prison activism/awareness projects.

Apply for Jumpstart Academy Internship

jumpstart

From Kate Weiner ’15:

Jumpstart Academy is an organization that seeks to educate, equip, and empower Nigerian youths through a two-year Leadership and Entrepreneurship program. This program melds community service learning with business opportunities in order to cultivate a new generation of ethical entrepreneurs.

Although based in Ibadan, Nigeria, Jumpstart is seeking interns at Wesleyan for the spring semester. Interns will work directly with Kate Weiner ’15, Jumpstart’s Creative Development Intern, to learn first-hand about building social enterprises through research, grant writing, fundraising, and community outreach opportunities.

Unpaid Interns Win Lawsuit Against Fox

“[Fox Searchlight Pictures] received the benefits of their unpaid work, which otherwise would have required paid employees.” – Judge William H. Pauley III on the suit brought against Fox by Eric Glatt ’91 (below) and Alex Footman ’09

Eric Glatt '91

In September 2011, we posted about two Wesleyan alumni, Alex Footman ’09 and Eric Glatt ’91 who brought a class-action lawsuit against Fox Searchlight Pictures. The two argued that, when they interned on the set of Black Swan, they performed menial tasks exclusively that had no educational value. By law, unpaid internships must provide some sort of educational experience and cannot simply be used to replace paid employees with unpaid labor. The two interns argued that they had not received the educational experience they should have gotten from the experience.

Just recently, Federal District Court Judge William H. Pauley III ruled that, as Fox Searchlight Pictures treated the workers as if they were regular paid employees and did not provide any sort of educational value to the internship, the interns should have been paid. The judge explained his logic to The Hollywood Reporter

Sustainability Intern Position Opening Up

Are you interested in a paid internship focused on sustainability efforts at Wesleyan? Noah Markman ’13 has good news for you, because a Sustainability Intern position is opening up for the spring of 2013:

The position will require ten hours of paid time per week, split by two students. It will be filled by students regardless of their work-study eligibility, but will be restricted by the 5 hour per week maximum. Pay is $8.25+/hour (depending on class year), 14 weeks/semester.

  • What: Sustainability Intern position
  • When: next semester
  • Paid: Oh yes!
  • Application Deadline: Wednesday, December 5th

To apply, send your resume and a one paragraph statement to wesustainability[at]gmail[dot]com by Wednesday, December 5th. Interviews will be held by appointment on Friday December 7th. More info about responsibilities after the jump!

NYT on Unpaid Internships and Their Discontents—After Graduation

Lee ’10: “If I ever become a famous filmmaker, I promise I will pay my interns.”

Wesleyan is in the New York Times this weekend. So are unpaid internships. It’s not what you think.

First there was the story of Alex Footman ’09, the aspiring filmmaker and Wesleyan graduate who served as unpaid production intern on the set of Black Swan in 2009 and later brought a highly publicized open class-action lawsuit against Fox Searchlight Pictures for labor exploitation. (Footman penned a New York Times op-ed in February, imploring the Labor Department to “take this matter seriously and step in to enforce its regulations.”) Then there was Lucy Bickerton ’08, the latest Wesleyan alumnus to turn an entertainment industry internship into a well-publicized lawsuit. Bickerton interned for PBS interviewer Charlie Rose in 2007. She “did everything an employee does except collect a paycheck,” she now claims. So, half a decade later, she’s suing for the minimum wage compensation she says she is owed.

The latest New York Times piece, headlined “Jobs Few, Grads Flock to Unpaid Internships,” casts an eye on the circumstances that lead to these lawsuits. It mentions Eric Glatt, the 40-year-old intern who sued Fox Searchlight with Footman, but not Footman himself or Bickerton. Its point: unpaid internships are no longer the domain of the summer vacation. Rather, in this job market, “many college graduates who expected to land paid jobs are turning to unpaid internships to try to get a foot in an employer’s door.” And today, postcollege internships are available not only in nonprofit work, but also in “fashion houses, book and magazine publishers, marketing companies, public relations firms, art galleries, talent agencies,” and even some law firms.

It doesn’t take journalist Steven Greenhouse ’73 long to arrive at the exploitative side of the practice. (Edit: frequent commenter John Wesley writes in to let me know that the article’s author is an alumnus as well.]

Bickerton ’08 v. Rose: Another Intern Rises Up

“I hope this lawsuit will help reverse the trend of unpaid internships replacing entry level opportunities.”

What is it with unpaid interns these days? Specifically, ones who graduated from Wesleyan. With film degrees. Between 2008 and 2009. And want to go into the entertainment industry. In New York. They’re going mad.

Or just demanding what is rightfully theirs.

Earlier this year, we reported on the Curious Case of Alex Footman ’09, an unpaid intern on the set of Black Swan who is seeking legal action against Fox Searchlight Pictures for what he regards as improper and illegal internship hiring. He is even seeking an injunction against Fox Searchlight for hiring similarly uncompensated interns in the future. When Footman penned a New York Times op-ed supporting stricter government oversight of unpaid internships, I posed the question: are unpaid internships necessarily exploitative? How can they be made fairer? Can they?

Lucy Bickerton ’08 is the latest Wesleyan alumnus to register her frustration with the unpaid internship system, specifically of the film and entertainment industry variety. Bickerton, a documentary filmmaker, is taking legal action against PBS interviewer Charlie Rose after interning for him in 2007, the summer before her senior year at Wes:

She says she toiled away 25 hours a week from June to August 2007, researching for the host, putting press packets together, escorting the guests and cleaning up after the show.

Bickerton, who went into documentary filmmaking after she graduated in 2008, did everything an employee does except collect a paycheck, she says in the suit. State law prohibits unpaid interns unless they are being trained and not performing in place of paid employees.

Sound familiar? Nearly five years later, Bickerton claims she was entitled to compensation of at least minimum wage of $6.75 to $7.15. Appropriately, Bickerton’s lawyer says she “sought legal advice after hearing that others who had worked for no pay as interns in the media industry had sued the Hearst and Fox organizations.” Go Wes. I decided to contact Bickerton to figure out her own perspective on the suit—and what it means for Wes students. Read on for a brief interview.