Tag Archives: israel

WTF is J Street U?

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WTF is J Street U at Wesleyan, you may ask? Why do they keep inviting me to fabulous lectures and movies and events? Great question!

Come find out this Tuesday, Sep 23!

We will be talking about things like
-Who is J Street U?
-Why two-states?
-How? What can we do?
-AND SO SO SO MUCH MORE

See you there!

Date: Tuesday, September 23rd
Time: 8:00 pm
Place: Outhouse (132 High Street)

Ron Young Talks to J Street U

10550920_545207282291623_4776325090364940686_nThis Monday evening, at 8PM in 41 Wyllys Room 110, we will have the opportunity to hear from Ron Young and ask him questions about his work as a consultant for the National Interreligious Initiative for Peace in the Middle East (NILI). This organization works with Jewish, Christian, and Muslim national religious organizations committed to developing consensus positions and mobilizing public support for active, fair and firm U.S. leadership for Arab-Israeli-Palestinian peace. Ron has spoken and written widely on the Middle East and interfaith cooperation, taught courses on Arab-Israeli-Palestinian conflict, and travelled widely in the Middle East. His forthcoming memoir is entitled Crossing Boundaries in the Americas, Vietnam and the Middle East.

PS Ron is a Wes alum, class of 1960!

We hope to see you there! Cookies will be provided

Date: Today!
Times: 8:00pm
Place: 41 Wyllys Rm 110

Israeli/Palestinian Vigil Draws Politically Diverse Students

IMG_3998At 8PM on Sunday night, Wesleyan students from across the political spectrum congregated for a candlelight vigil to mourn the loss of Israeli and Palestinian lives due to the violence in the region over the summer.

“I thought this was an amazing event,” said Isabel Alter ’17. “I am really glad we didn’t discuss politics.”

Students gathered in a circle with candles in hand. The organizers of the event distributed to each attendee a segment of a list of names of those lost. When the first candle was lit, students began to simultaneously recite the names on their list. Once the names were read, a moment of silence was respected.

Students Publish Disorientation Guide to Activism at Wes

 

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So maybe you’re a freshman, nervous and overwhelmed by all the information coming at you about classes, housing, what to bring from home – and are feeling like you can’t even begin to think about bigger issues on campus. Or maybe you’re a senior and feel like you’ve gotten this far and never really involved yourself in any social/political engagement on campus, so now it’s way too late and where would you even begin if you wanted to. Wherever you might stand, activism at Wes can seem like a huge, widespread and unnavigable thing.

Thankfully, some very committed students are trying to change that sentiment and make activism within the Wesleyan world an approachable and cohesive community. This past week, the Disorientation Guide was released through the University Organizing Center site to bring together the wide-ranging issues affecting us into one document. The entire Disorientation zine can be downloaded here, and I strongly recommend that everyone take a look at it.

WSA Passes Resolution 11.35: Wesleyan Divestment from Companies Profiting from or Contributing to Illegal Occupation of Palestine

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A few days ago, on Sunday, May 4, the Wesleyan Student Assembly (WSA) passed Resolution 11.35: Wesleyan Divestment from Companies Profiting from or Contributing to Illegal Occupation of Palestine. This resolution has two operative clauses. The first calls upon Wesleyan University to divest from companies that a) provide weapons, security systems, prisons, or military support for the occupation of Palestinian land; b) build or maintain the wall between Israel and Palestine and the demolition of Palestinian homes; and c) help build, maintain, or develop Israeli settlements, outposts, roads, and transportation systems in occupied Palestinian territory (defined in the resolution as the Gaza Strip, West Bank, and East Jerusalem). The goal of the resolution is to remove the financial incentive to participate in the occupation of Palestinian land. The resolution’s second clause recognizes that the University will likely not divest from Israeli companies, and thus calls upon the WSA to divest its own endowment from the University’s endowment to avoid supporting the occupation by the transitive property. 

Wesleyan Joins “Open Hillel” Movement

logoIn recent months, colleges around the nation have started challenging Hillel International over their policy surrounding Israel discourse. The movement first started at Harvard, where the local Hillel was barred by the national organization from co-sponsoring a discussion with a Palestinian student group.

Swarthmore became the first “Open Hillel” in early December, declaring that they will no longer abide by the guidelines presented by Hillel national. In their official statement, Swarthmore’s Hillel declared that, “All are welcome to walk through our doors and speak with our name and under our roof, be they Zionist, anti-Zionist, post-Zionist, or non-Zionist.”

Hillel’s official guidelines specify that groups or speakers that deny the right of Israel to exist, support the BDS (boycott, divest and sanction) movement or, “delegitimize, demonize or apply a double standard to Israel” will not be hosted by the organization.

The movement has been met with backlash, especially from the national Hillel organization. As quoted in the New York Times, Eric Fingerhut, the president and chief executive of Hillel, responded to the movement by stating that, “ ‘anti-Zionists’ will not be permitted to speak using the Hillel name or under the Hillel roof, under any circumstances.”

Students Call on WSA to Divest from Israeli Occupation

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There are new developments from the ongoing controversy around President Roth’s denunciation of the American Studies Association’s recent resolution supporting the academic boycott of Israeli universities. Alums began circulating a still-growing petition earlier this month expressing support for the ASA decision and criticizing Roth for poor argument and hypocrisy.

Current Wes students, it seems, have followed suit. A separate petition has been making the rounds on email and social media in recent days and has already garnered over fifty signatures. Echoing the alumni declarations of support for the ASA’s boycott, the document also calls on the WSA to divest its own holdings from  “companies that directly profit from or materially contribute to the illegal occupation of the Palestinian territories”.

If such a resolution is adopted, Wesleyan will be following a long and growing line of universities who have endorsed the BDS movement. Read the full text of the petition after the jump or sign here:

J Street U Coffee Talk: An Invitation to Dialogue

israelpalestine-flagsFrom Jacob Seltzer ’17:

Curious about the meaning of Israel Apartheid Week? Want to be a part of a productive open discussion about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict? Come to the second coffee talk hosted by J Street U. Coffee and Doughnuts will be served.

Date: Wednesday, February 26
Time: 8:30 – 9:30 PM
Place: PAC 104

A Misguided Boycott

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Over the past few weeks, it has been difficult to see a newspaper, blog or journal without reading an opinion about the recent vote by the American Studies Association (ASA) to boycott Israeli universities. The ASA boycott incorporates “formal collaborations with Israeli academic institutions” and “scholars who are expressly serving as representatives or ambassadors of those institutions.”I think the boycott is misguided and wrong. Boycotting all Israeli universities is a grave assault on academic freedom and does little to achieve peace.

I am glad to see that President Roth condemned the boycott. Roth argued that the boycott lacked consistency. That is, why boycott Israel while ignoring North Korea, Russia or China? This argument has merit and proves a double standard on the part of the ASA. However, many opinions have used this argument to show that the boycott has its foundations in anti-Semitism. The President of the ASA did not help his case when stating that, “One has to start somewhere” when explaining the decision to boycott Israel. However, there is no reason to believe that the ASA had its motives rooted in anti-Jewish sentiment.

To understand the morality of the boycott, I think it is important to explore the purpose of a university. Universities, like many institutions, are concerned with professional, not political, performance. While the ASA will not be boycotting specific Israeli professors based on their citizenship, they will not allow them to participate in academic forums if they are sponsored by an Israeli institution. However, if an Israeli institution condemns the occupation, they are exempt from the boycott. I personally do think that Israeli universities should take a stance in opposition to the occupation, but I think it is wrong to boycott universities based on their views. To explain this reasoning I would like to propose a thought experiment. University X is a progressive, liberal institution. However, Professor Y, who is eligible for tenure, is an outspoken critic of many of the university’s policies. It would be wrong of the board of trustees to deny this professor tenure because he does not conform to the university’s beliefs. Non-conforming ideas lead to progress. A university has the right to define its own beliefs, however misguided they may be.

Israeli Democracy: What Threatens it and How to Save it, with Author Gershom Gorenberg

jstreetEmily Greenspan ’16 has a message for you:

J Street U invites you to think about the future of Israeli Democracy, and admire this awesome beard.

Gershom Gorenberg is the author of The Unmaking of Israel, a provocative examination of Israeli history that describes the crisis of Israeli democracy and lays out a vision for the country’s future.

“Until I read The Unmaking of Israel,” says novelist Michael Chabon, “I didn’t think it could be possible to feel more despairing, and then more terribly hopeful, about Israel.”

Gorenberg’s previous book is The Accidental Empire: Israel and the Birth of the Settlements, 1967-1977. The New York Times called it, “Remarkably insightful … A groundbreaking revision that deserves to reframe the entire debate.”

He has written for the New York Times Magazine, Haaretz and Foreign Policy Magazine. He lives in Jerusalem.

Come join us for what will be a great talk and Q&A!

Date: November 14, 2013
Time: 7:00 PM – 8:30 PM
Place: PAC 001
Cost: Free
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