Tag Archives: journalism

Data, Computing and Journalism

An invitation to an exciting presentation, courtesy of Joli Holmes ’17:

Increasingly, journalists are turning to tools that were once solely the domain of data analysts and computer scientists to create compelling visualizations and enhance their storytelling. Newsrooms are using accessible technology to process big and open data to assist in investigations, keep citizens informed, and help make institutions accountable— and they’re often following the tenets of data science, like making their work transparent and reproducible. It’s important, now more than ever, that data not be hidden by government agencies from the public so that it instead might be used to illuminate the truth.

Andrew, currently a Koeppel Journalism Fellow at the Center for the Study of Public Life (co-teaching QAC 250) is the senior data editor of Trend CT (http://trendct.org/about/ a CT Mirror affiliate). He was a founding producer of The Boston Globe’s Data Desk where he used a variety of methods to visualize or tell stories with data. He also was an online producer at The Virginian-Pilot and a staff writer at the South Florida Sun-Sentinel. He’s a Metpro Fellow, a Chips Quinn Scholar, and a graduate of the University of Texas.

Date: Monday, February 13th
Time: 4:30 p.m.
Place: Allbritton 103

WESU and the Argus Present: Julie Burstein (’80)

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PSA from Tess Altman ’17:

Julie Burstein, creator of WNYC’s Studio 360, best-selling author, and
TED speaker, will be giving a talk on the power of listening. She will
discuss how her experience as a DJ at WESU sparked her passion for
finding and telling stories, and will reveal the questions that can
allow you to uncover resonant stories, which then become the heart of
your communication with teachers, potential employers, and each other.

Earlier in the day, at 4:15 pm, Julie will be leading a workshop in 41
Wyllys Room 115 on uncertainty and how it can be used to expand your
creativity. The capacity is limited so please fill out this google
form
if you want to attend.

Date: Wednesday, April 8th
Time: 7:00-8:00 PM
Place: CFA Hall

 

Bring Your Voice to The Argus

Gabriel Rosenberg ’16 writes in:

What matters to students, matters to The Wesleyan Argus. Wesleyan University’s twice-weekly student newspaper covers the issues important to campus: Need-aware admissions, fraternity co-education, Black Lives Matter, divestment, sexual assault, and more.
This Sunday, Feb. 1, we are looking for new writers, photographers, illustrators, web designers, columnists, copy editors, and layout staff to join the largest and most prolific publication on campus. We want new voices, fresh opinions, and inquisitive reporters. Join us in Usdan 108—the snacks are on us.

Date: Sunday, February 1st – today!
Time: 2:00pm – 3:00pm
Place: Usdan, rm. 108

Aural Wes First Meeting of 2015

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PSA from Chris Gortmaker ’17:

Aural Wes’ first meeting of 2015 will be this Wednesday at 9:15 PM in
Usdan 114. If you’re passionate about Wesleyan’s music scene or feel
like you might be (you probably will be soon enough), then you should
come and see what Aural Wes is all about! Experience in music
journalism is by no means necessary.

We’re looking for writers, editors, web designers, photographers,
videographers, and social media hype-machines. With Aural Wes, you’ll
be on the beat of music happenings at Wes. From hanging out with
touring groups that come through campus to covering the vibrant
student music community, there are a ton of opportunities for awesome
journalism waiting for you.

If you can’t make the meeting on Wednesday and still want to get
involved, don’t hesitate to email teamauralwes[at]gmail[dot]com and we’ll
chat.

Date: Wednesday, January 28th
Time: 9:15-11:15 PM
Place: Usdan 114

Student Forum Interest Meeting: Radio Storytelling

Rebecca Seidel ’15 and Aviva Hirsch ’16 invite you to an interest meeting for their student forum:

Calling all podcast enthusiasts, future radio producers, writers, listeners, storytellers, soundscapers, and people in general:
We are having an interest meeting tomorrow for our student forum, Radio Storytelling: Crafting a Narrative Through Sound. The forum will be part seminar and part workshop, and it will give you a chance to listen to, talk about, and produce your own radio stories. For more info about what we’ll be doing and how you can enroll, come to Allbritton 004 tomorrow at 2PM!

Date: Saturday, January 25 – tomorrow!
Time: 2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Place: Allbritton 004 (next to Espwesso)

From Medicine to the Digital Marketplace: Narrating “Narrative in the Age of Distraction”

In a world of pithy tweets and ephemeral snapchats, where six-second attention spans face a proliferation of media so vast it seems only to stimulate their hunger for information rather than satisfy it, what real chance does a story have at being heard? Last Thursday and Friday, a motley assortment of professors, health practitioners, and industry professionals descended upon the CFA for a conference entitled “Narrative in the Age of Distraction” to examine the value of narrative and explore its technologically imposed limits. Their input, by turns reassuring and unsettling, rearticulated that all-too-frustratingly-apparent paradox of our time: the story is dead, long live the story.

The conference, co-sponsored by The Connection Institute for Innovative Practice and Wesleyan’s College of Letters, Writing Programs, and Science in Society Program, was divided into two “tracks,” each focusing on the role of narrative in a different field. The first, “Healing Letters,” addressed the uses of narrative in medicine, followed by “Narrative in the Age of Twitter,” a series of discussions about the future of long-form storytelling in the cyber-free-for-all it must both complement and transcend. The premise of the conference was that narrative, whether functioning as art or healing, is a crucial determinant of how we perceive the world, and yet it is threatened by the very media that support it.

Investigative Journalism: From Print to Digital

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From the unquestionably cool Lily Baggott ’15:

The Argus Speaker Series is back! This Tuesday, Oct. 29, Lisa Chedekel ’82 is coming to campus to talk about her experiences as a journalist in a rapidly changing industry. A Q&A session will follow. Refreshments will be served.

Chedekel is a senior writer for the Connecticut Health Investigative Team (C-HIT), which produces in-depth, online journalism concerning issues of health and safety, and she serves as Writer and Media Relations Manager at the Boston University School of Public Health. Chedekel is also a former Hartford Courant reporter, and winner of numerous journalism awards, including a 1999 Pulitzer Prize awarded to a Courant team of reporters and a 2007 George Polk Award.

The event is held at the Romance Languages and Literatures (RLAL) Lounge at 300 High St. (between Downey House and Russell House, across from the Davison Art Center).

Date: Tuesday, October 29th, 2013
Time: 7 PM
Place: 300 High St.: Romance Languages and Literatures (RLAL) Lounge
Cost: Free!

Majora Carter ’88, Commencement Speaker, Accused of Turning Corporate

Joss Whedon ’86 won’t be the most controversial honorary degree recipient at Commencement this May.

Majora

A recent New York Times article, Hero of the Bronx is Now Accused of Betraying It, details the rise of our very own (and this year’s lesser-publicized Honorary Degree recipientMajora Carter ’88. Carter founded the program Sustainable South Bronx, supporting local food production and urban revitalization in the South Bronx. Now she is consulting for corporations like FreshDirect, which has recently occupied a huge lot in the South Bronx, but serves clients mostly in Manhattan and none in the neighborhood around it. That’s not to mention the $500 fee Carter reportedly charges for initial consultations. Journalist Winnie Hu gives the overview:

Ms. Carter’s meteoric rise also made her a polarizing figure. Many former allies and neighbors say that Ms. Carter trades on the credibility she built in the Bronx, while no longer representing its interests. They say she has capitalized on past good deeds in the way that politicians parlay their contacts into a lobbying career, or government regulators are hired by the companies they once covered.

“You can’t have it both ways,” said Eddie Bautista, executive director of the New York City Environmental Justice Alliance. “Either you’re an honest broker and accountable to the community, or you’re working for a business interest and accountable to that.”

Carter is accused of betraying her ideals and becoming a fallen hero of sorts. (When Wesleying tweeted out a link to the article, South Bronx Unite and other critical parties were quick to weigh in on the situation as it’s perceived. Carter herself briefly joined in with a YouTube dedication of her own.) Some fellow alumni are making the connection to Wes:

Oil, War, and the Future of Iraq

Remember Iraq? Yes, well, we left it worse than we found it, and Ben Van  Heuvelen ties it in with environmental issues:

Ben Van Heuvelen is the managing editor of the Iraq Oil Report. His work has appeared in the Washington Post, Foreign Policy, The Atlantic, and Salon. He writes about Iraq, oil, and the geopolitics of energy; American foreign policy, politics and culture; and religion. He was formerly a research fellow at the New America Foundation.

Date: Today, April 17th
Time: 12pm-1pm
Place: PAC 001
Cost: 0

Jacques Steinberg Visits the Backdrop of ‘The Gatekeepers’ 10 Years On

On Tuesday night, Jacques Steinberg spoke to a sweltering Memorial Chapel. He is the author of The Gatekeepers, a bestselling nonfiction account of the college admissions process that used Wesleyan as its backdrop, but the subject of the evening revolved around a more urgent issue in higher education than just the insane selectivity of the best schools — that of college affordability. Steinberg had recently left his post at The Choice, the New York Times education blog that he pioneered, to work at a New York-based nonprofit called Say Yes to Education that helps disadvantaged high school students get into college, pay for it, and graduate.

Many of the problems he described, he felt, were too urgent to simply stand by and observe as a journalist. With budget cuts, many college counselors’ caseloads in public schools have ballooned to over 500 students. The student loan/debt cycle is a familiar anxiety to many students here, as well as recent graduates, and he described how some graduates in debt don’t pay off their loans until their children are almost ready to go to college.

He reminded Wesleyan students of how fortunate they were, in spite of the controversy over need-aware admissions. Wesleyan remains one of the few institutions in the country that can meet students’ full demonstrated financial need. The question of the value of higher education, he said, is relatively new and wasn’t really circulating at the time that he wrote The Gatekeepers, but now it will likely become a key policy question in the next few years. He said it will probably become important to ask about vocational and differently-paced tiers of higher education without seeming racist or insulting.