Tag Archives: labor

THESISCRAZY 2019 (Part 2): Em, Emm & Emma

Things are getting dire in the CSS Lounge: “Send Help” + a very ambitious chapter schedule!

Welcome to the second installment of THESISCRAZY 2019! We had some technical difficulties and lost this post when our site went down (always save your work, friends!!!), but we’re back and better than ever now!

It’s getting close to the deadline (FIVE MORE DAYS AAAHHHHH) and we know you’re looking for an excuse to procrastinate/distract you from the weekend of work ahead. Just know that all of us here at Wesleying believe in you!! You’ve got this!!

In addition to today’s post, you can read part one of this year’s series here, and past years’ posts here.

Today, we have three Emmas who are writing three super-cool theses! Check out their interviews below the jump!

Fair Wages, Fair Hiring: More on Yesterday’s Demonstrations and Student Meeting with RJ Julia

Two weeks ago, USLAC released a statement highlighting unfair hiring practices by management at RJ Julia Booksellers, the managing company of Wesleyan’s new book store, which is scheduled to open later this year. Specifically, USLAC brought attention to workers being promised interviews at the new bookstore and having to wait months for an interview. According to the statement, several nonwhite employees were told that they didn’t fit the “RJ Julia Experience.”

USLAC made three public demands of RJ Julia and the Wesleyan administration in response to these accounts:

1. Give all current bookstore workers the opportunity to keep their jobs if they wish to.
2. Guarantee that returning workers will receive at least the salary and benefits they had been receiving before the move.
3. Inform workers immediately about any changes in their workplace and allow them the chance to discuss these issues freely without fear of losing their jobs.

Monday afternoon, a delegation of students voiced their concerns to the RJ Julia general manager outside of North College after a meeting between two students and the general manager was interrupted by a fire alarm.

Music & Work: Exploring the Soundtrack to Our Working Lives

From Tess Altman ’17:

Join Matt Dineen for a reading and discussion around his new zine “Not for You: Stories of Music & Work in the Precarious Service Industry.” The zine is part of the Music & Work Project and explores the antagonistic dynamics between management, workers, and customers in relationship to the beats, rhythms, lyrics, and melodies played at his past jobs. Come share your own experiences!

Date: Monday, October 12th
Time: 8:00pm – 9:00pm
Place: Allbritton, rm. 311

Read on after the jump for more information about The Music & Work Project:

Students Publish Disorientation Guide to Activism at Wes

 

disorientation

So maybe you’re a freshman, nervous and overwhelmed by all the information coming at you about classes, housing, what to bring from home – and are feeling like you can’t even begin to think about bigger issues on campus. Or maybe you’re a senior and feel like you’ve gotten this far and never really involved yourself in any social/political engagement on campus, so now it’s way too late and where would you even begin if you wanted to. Wherever you might stand, activism at Wes can seem like a huge, widespread and unnavigable thing.

Thankfully, some very committed students are trying to change that sentiment and make activism within the Wesleyan world an approachable and cohesive community. This past week, the Disorientation Guide was released through the University Organizing Center site to bring together the wide-ranging issues affecting us into one document. The entire Disorientation zine can be downloaded here, and I strongly recommend that everyone take a look at it.

The College Bubble: A Higher Ed Round-Up

Elizabeth Warren continues to be a powerful force in the campaign to fix the student loan system. Warren spoke at a recent hearing for the Health, Education, Labor & Pensions committee, saying that although the  interest rate necessary to cover the cost of the student loan program without making a profit would be about 2.5%, the government is charging students nearly twice that amount for undergraduate loans, and even more for graduate and direct loans.  But Warren has come under fire from critics who say that the figures she is using in her argument are wrong.

In the follow-up to the controversy surrounding the suspension of Northeastern‘s chapter of Students for Justice in Palestine by the school,