Tag Archives: lori gruen

Climate Ambassadors: Animal Agriculture and Sustainability Faculty Panel

sustainability panelAn event presented by Climate Ambassadors:

Interested in food? Interested in the environment? Interested in how they affect each other? Concerned about climate change, social inequality, and environmental responsibility?

Climate Ambassadors is hosting a faculty panel to address these issues! Professors Lori Gruen (PHIL/ENVS/FGSS), Tony Hatch (SISP/SOC), and Sharisse Kanet (PHIL) will be discussing the impact of big agriculture on the environment and its role in climate change. We will also look at how often institutions, such as Wesleyan, invest in big agriculture, and the social effects of changes to big agriculture, including public health implications. Also, there will be FREE TYPHOON DINNER!!! (yes FREE!)

Date: Tuesday, February 9
Time: 6:30-8 PM
Place: PAC 001
facebook event

Gallery Talk—“Animal Dignity and an Ethics of Sight—Photography by Isa Leshko and Frank Noelker”

animal_eventFrom the folks at the CFA:

Curated by Lori Gruen, Professor of Philosophy, Environmental Studies, and Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. In contrast to the viral images of “cute” animals that fill digital spaces, photographers Isa Leshko and Frank Noelker sensitively portray captive animals in an evocative exhibition that asks viewers to reflect on our complicated relationships with other animals.

Ms. Leshko’s “Elderly Animals” presents unusual sights—the sometimes fierce, sometimes gentle dignity of aging farm animals who are rarely seen at the end of their natural lifespans. For his work “Captive Beauty,” Mr. Noelker spent nearly a decade visiting over 300 zoos all over the world and photographically captured the beauty, the dignity, the loneliness, and the absurdity of the animals we keep in artificial environments.

Date: Friday, September 26
Time: 4:30-5:30 PM
Place: Zilkha Gallery

Happening Now: Redeveloping Our Brownfields: An Open Forum for Education and Discussion

From Maggie Feldman-Piltch ’14:

Brownfields are sites recognized by the state or federal government as contaminated by toxins. More than three exist within the limits of Middletown, including on Long Lane Farm, and both Beckham Hall and 41 Wyllys are remediated brownfield sites.

Join members of Professor Lori Gruen’s “Justice and the Environment” for an educational discussion regarding Middletown-area brownfields and how we can get involved in their remediation and redevelopment. Light Refreshments will be served!

Date: Saturday, November 17th
Time: 2pm-3pm
Place: 41 Wyllys, Olson Commons
Facebook Event: Link.

Animal Studies Takes Center Stage in Wes’ Humanities Classes

Wesleyan, according to reputable mainstream media sources, is again on the cutting edge of academia: no longer just the “epicenter of surrealist Brooklyn pop” or breeding ground for a rising film mafia, we are apparently also pioneers in what the New York Times identifies as “the growing, but still undefined, field of animal studies,” which seems to connote “anything that has to do with the way humans and animals interact.” Not that there’s anything especially new about that—except the Times notes a particularly striking surge of interest, particularly among the humanities, where, traditionally, “monkey chow is never served and all the mazes are made of words, the attention of scholars was firmly fixed on humans.”

Today, not so. Right. And Wesleyan is at the center of all this interest (and not just because you fulfilled your NSM credits by looking at pictures of saki monkeys in Biodiversity). (Well, that was me.) Dartmouth may boast offering an English class with the name “Animals and Women in Western Literature: Nags, Bitches and Shrews,” but Wesleyan now offers a summer fellowship program in conjunction with the Animals and Society Institute, which presently lists over 100 animal studies courses at various colleges and universities nationwide nationwide. Professor Lori Gruen, Philosophy chair, coordinates this program and has much to say about the links between animal studies and philosophy scholarship:

Lori Gruen, head of the philosophy department at Wesleyan and coordinator of the summer fellowship program in animal studies there, said one of the major questions in philosophy was “Who should we direct our moral interest to?” Thirty years ago, she said, animals were at the margins of philosophical discussions of ethics; now “the animal question is right in the center of ethical discussion.”