Tag Archives: money

Notable “Wesleyan” Alumni

According to the university’s website, “Wesleyan graduates are successful in every profession imaginable, including law, science, medicine, business, politics, and the creative arts. They are often leaders and innovators in their fields”. With all the recent focus on Lin-Manuel Miranda, we thought we’d shed some light on the other people who made the name “Wesleyan” famous.

PCSE Seed Grant Pitch Competition!

Six teams of students are in the running for three $5,000 grants from the Patricelli Center for Social Entrepreneurship. They’ll go head-to-head in a public pitch competition this Friday and, based on the potential impact and feasibility of their projects and the caliber of their teams, a panel of alumni judges will determine which of the noble ventures to fund.

Read more about the finalists after the jump, and come cheer for your friends and favorite projects tomorrow! Pizza will be provided, and a webcast will be available here.

Date: Friday, February 27
Time: 12:00 – 1:00 PM
Place: PAC 002 (and webcast)

Make a Film with the Wesleyan Film Project

From the cinematographic hands of  Jacob Sussman ’17

The Wesleyan Film Project just purchased a $3,600 suite of film
production equipment, and we’re looking for some student filmmakers
to put it to good use!

If you have an idea for a short film, music video, or creative project
of any sort, send us an email at wesleyanfilmproject@gmail.com and we
will help you towards making your film a reality. We can provide you
with gear, funding, and help you to assemble a production crew and
cast. Wooh, let’s make some films!

Facebook link

Speaking the Language: What You Need to Know About Finance and Accounting

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Whether you start your own organization after college or join someone else’s, at some point you’re going to have to know stuff about money. The Patricelli Center for Social Entrepreneurship wants you to come talk finance with Carl Byers ’93:

Entrepreneurs, intrapreneurs, and changemakers of all kinds must learn to speak the language of finance in order to clearly communicate their vision and plans. This session will explain essential ideas related to for-profits, non-profits, finance, and accounting, so you can articulate ideas in a format — with precise terminology — that will be compelling to colleagues, funders, and other stakeholders. In addition to terminology, this session will cover the process of developing financial plans and documents that make your vision credible to those who have the resources needed to enable your work.

Carl Byers ’93 is an Adjunct Lecturer in Public Policy at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University and a Venture Partner at Fidelity Biosciences.

Date: TODAY
Time: 6 – 8 PM
Place: Allbritton 311
Cost: Free! Register Here.

The College Bubble: A Higher Ed Round-Up

Elizabeth Warren continues to be a powerful force in the campaign to fix the student loan system. Warren spoke at a recent hearing for the Health, Education, Labor & Pensions committee, saying that although the  interest rate necessary to cover the cost of the student loan program without making a profit would be about 2.5%, the government is charging students nearly twice that amount for undergraduate loans, and even more for graduate and direct loans.  But Warren has come under fire from critics who say that the figures she is using in her argument are wrong.

In the follow-up to the controversy surrounding the suspension of Northeastern‘s chapter of Students for Justice in Palestine by the school, 

Apply to Be an Orientation Intern or Leader

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From Elisa Cardona and the nifty Office of Student Activities and Leadership Development:

Have you always wanted to make a difference in the Wesleyan Community?

Now is your chance! The Office of New Student Orientation is looking for 4 eager and excited orientation summer interns and 30 equally excited and vibrant fall Orientation Leaders.

Projects for Peace and PCSE Seed Grant Information Sessions

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From Jelisa Adair ’13 and the PCSE:

The Patricelli Center for Social Entrepreneurship is offering two grants to fund projects or ventures led by one or more Wesleyan student(s).

PCSE SEED GRANT: Three $5,000 grants to fund the launch or early stage growth of a Wesleyan-connected social enterprise, project, program, or venture. Details and timeline here. Read about last year’s winners here.

KATHRYN W. DAVIS PRIZE FOR PEACE: One $10,000 grant for a grassroots summer project anywhere in the world which promotes peace and addresses the root causes of conflict among parties.  Details and timeline here. Read about last year’s winners here.

There are two remaining information sessions focused primarily on these two grants. Students who are considering applying for a PCSE Seed Grant and/or a Davis Prize are strongly encouraged to attend one of these meetings.

During these sessions, staff may also be available to answer questions about the Patricelli Center Enrichment Grant, the Patricelli Center Internship GrantWesleyan Summer Experience Grant, and various awards and prizes offered outside of Wesleyan.

Lunch will not be provided, but you are welcome to bring your own.

Date: Tuesday, December 3rd and Wednesday, December 4th
Time: 12:15pm
Place: Usdan 114 on Tuesday and Usdan 136 on Wednesday

Need-Blind Wes Is Back

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This courtesy of Evan Bieder ’15:

After a brief hiatus, Need Blind Wes is back!

For those who don’t know, in 2012 Wesleyan terminated its need blind admissions policy. As a result, the socio-economic status of about 10% of applicants for the Class of 2017 played a role in their acceptance/rejection. Last year, many students pushed back against this new policy (through a banner dropan occupation of a Board of Trustees meetinga homecoming protest, and a number of other actions/discussions archived on the Need Blind website), but the policy was implemented nonetheless.

This discriminatory policy has already impacted Wesleyan’s socio-economic diversity. From the class of 2016 to the class of 2017 the number of students receiving financial aid decreased from 48% to 42%, the number of students receiving grant aid decreased from 44% to 37%, and the number of first generation four-year college students decreased from 16% to 13%.