Tag Archives: need-aware

Josh Krugman ’14 Speaks at Senior Reception about Need-Blind

On Tuesday, December 3, there was a senior class reception held by SWAG (Seniors of Wesleyan Annual Gift) in Beckham Hall. At the reception, a number of administrators gave speeches about why students should give to Wesleyan.

And then, Josh Krugman ’14 got up and gave a speech about need-blind, how the University handles donations, and why you maybe shouldn’t give to Wes.

The video is above and a rough transcript is past the jump, courtesy of Josh. When you watch the video, notice the how the administrators and those planning the event try and pressure Josh off the stage and how the student band begins playing to try and drown out his speech. Also, unseen in this video is Michael Roth bolting out of the room when Josh got up there.

BZOD EDIT 12/9/13, 1:50 PM: For some much-needed clarification on that 68% figure, check out this article

Grinnell Considers Cutting Need-Blind: A Comparison

Grinnell, like Wesleyan, is considering some fierce changes to its financial aid policies. As Kevin Kiley of Inside Higher Ed, the same writer who reported on Wesleyan’s policy change this summer, writes:

Grinnell College, which this year reported the fifth-largest endowment of any liberal arts college, announced Thursday that it would spend the next few months engaged in a conversation with campus stakeholders about changing its financial aid policies—including potentially, but probably not, going as far as making changes to need-blind admission.

Grinnell has about 1700 students and an endowment of roughly $1.5 billion. This puts their endowment per capita in the range of $800,000, or roughly four times that of Wesleyan. However, “the amount [Grinnell] spends on financial aid as a portion of its gross tuition revenue” is currently above 60%, while Wesleyan’s is only projected to be to be 37% in 2012.

As Kiley notes, Grinnell’s finances are in wonderful shape as compared with other top liberal arts colleges (including Wesleyan), and its announcement “could be a bellwether that the sector as a whole is reconsidering the model.”

Support Need-Blind On Your Way To Pi

A message from Need-Blind Dumbledore’s Army Direct Action :

Are you looking for a quick and easy way to contribute to the Need-Blind campaign? Do you have hands? Then come to the Exley lobby Friday at 2:30pm to help turn 12 yards of felt into 2,800 red squares raising awareness about Need-Blind! You can stay for five minutes or for five hours (although we’ll be long gone by then).

Red squares are a worldwide symbol of accessible education; here at Wesleyan students have been writing their own messages about Need-Blind in black sharpie (school colors dontcha know).

We’ll provide the red felt, some safety pins and a few sharpies, but we could really use more safety pins and sharpies.

See you at 2:30,

Some people who might not be here without Need-Blind.

Date: September, 21
Time: 2:30 p.m.
Place: Exley lobby

Memes for a Need-Blind Wes

Just because it’s the summer doesn’t mean the activism has to stop.  A new Tumblr is taking on the change in the need-blind policy one meme at a time.

The creator of the tumblr says ze created it to “point out all the terrible contradictions both he and the administration say/do at the expense of need-blind admissions.”  Ze asserts:

“He has an at-first-glance convincing argument: basically, right now the amount of money we can give for financial aid would allow us to accept 90% of the incoming class need-blind. However, after the budget for financial aid runs out, admissions will need to look at applicants financial situation. Roth says that there is no reason to avoid repealing need-blind just because it is “morally pure” to keep it. Rather, the university’s first priority is “to provide the best chance of success to the students we graduate.” That makes sense; don’t sacrifice quality over… morality?”

Check out the rest of the memes at rothtastic.tumblr.com.

KEEP WES NEED-BLINDAlso, if you haven’t already, check out the Need-Blind Admissions Policy Focus Group website.  The site features historical and financial information in addition to linking to discussion on the policy change.

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Tag: need-blind