Tag Archives: need blind

Good News: The Endowment is Up 12%

THIS ISWHY

Wesleyan’s annual Financial Report was published last week, and the endowment is up 12%, if you exclude the $28 million siphoned off to pay for current operations, but add the pledges from the “This Is Why” campaign. Additionally, the university took in $11 million more in income than it spent in the fiscal year that ended last June. This should be good news for all those who are disgruntled by the need-blind situation. We’re on our way to having enough money to spend on basic operations, and maybe return to need-blind. This won’t happen soon, but it’s at least a positive step forward.

In Fiscal Year 2012/13:

  • Alumni, parents, friends, lovers gave $42 million in cash to Wesleyan, an $11 million increase from the prior year
  • 46% of alumni donated funds
  • $55 million in new gifts (cash, pledges and bequests)
  • Financial aid totaling $55 million increased approximately 7%, resulting in an undergraduate tuition discount rate of 36%, an increase from 35% in FY 2011/12
  • A total of $308 million toward the campaign’s overall goal of $400 million

Need-Blind Wes Is Back

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This courtesy of Evan Bieder ’15:

After a brief hiatus, Need Blind Wes is back!

For those who don’t know, in 2012 Wesleyan terminated its need blind admissions policy. As a result, the socio-economic status of about 10% of applicants for the Class of 2017 played a role in their acceptance/rejection. Last year, many students pushed back against this new policy (through a banner dropan occupation of a Board of Trustees meetinga homecoming protest, and a number of other actions/discussions archived on the Need Blind website), but the policy was implemented nonetheless.

This discriminatory policy has already impacted Wesleyan’s socio-economic diversity. From the class of 2016 to the class of 2017 the number of students receiving financial aid decreased from 48% to 42%, the number of students receiving grant aid decreased from 44% to 37%, and the number of first generation four-year college students decreased from 16% to 13%. 

President Roth, I Expect Your Efforts Redoubled

On the 24th of September 2012, you, President Roth, asked of us a favor. And we agreed.
I am here to keep that promise.

Is This Why?

“You should say, we have a commitment to diversity: we want to see that. In the demographics, not just the rhetoric,” urged President Roth one balmy September evening. “Because the rhetoric, whether it’s you’re in favor of need blind or I say I’m in favor of more scholarships, rhetoric is easy. Let’s see who’s here.”

Well, the results are in.

To sum up, the diversity of the Class of 2017 is markedly different from preceding Classes. As a percentage of the Class, students of color dropped slightly to 37 percent, while on the socioeconomic front the number of students receiving financial aid falls well short of any recent generation of Wesleyan students, dropping to 42 percent from 48 percent last year. Similarly, the number of students receiving grant-aid fell to 37 percent from 44 percent in the previous class. Meanwhile, the number of first-generation college students declined to 13 percent from 16 percent.

Unofficial Orientation Series: The Wrath Update, or Everything You Need to Know About All the Things People Have Been Getting Angry About Lately and Hot Damn This Is a Long Post Title

Always be closing deconstructing…

 There is always hope.

Welcome to utopia! Er, sorta. Well, not really. Actually not at all. Like all the world, good old Wesleyan is plagued with many social ills. Some are more intractable than others, some more terrible than others. I am not here to pass judgment. I am here only to give you the quick run-down on all most of the things people at Wes have been getting upset about of late. To avoid showing favoritism I put these in random order (literally). Please feel free to add/question/editorialize in the comments below.

This is the Wrath Update. First up:

Chalking

At Wes, University Policy prohibits the use of chalk “on sidewalks or buildings.” For many students — though definitely not all — this constitutes a violation of the right to free speech and the battle over the chalking policy has raged fiercely for over a decade. On the 3rd of October 2002, then-President Doug Bennet ’59 put forth a moratorium on Wesleyan’s storied tradition of chalking, a moratorium which was theoretically temporary but was never lifted. In those days, you could spend an hour reading chalkings on the hundred-yard walk from PAC to what’s now Usdan. Chalking was primarily used as an empowerment medium for the queer community, but, of course, a few individuals took things a little too far. I do not need to get into the details; you go to Wesleyan so you can imagine it. We still occasionally witness hateful and hurtful public messages around campus.

“Where Are They Now?”: An Interview with Former President William Chace

Our second (and maybe final) presidential interview is with William Chace, president from 1988 to 1994.

William Chace was only president of Wesleyan for six years, but between firebombings, racially charged graffiti, student occupations, and hunger strikes, he probably dealt with enough strife and campus unrest to fill two decades of Wes history. Twenty years later, Chace, a literature scholar and former Stanford administrator, still wrestles with his Wesleyan experience. “Those were the hardest years of my life,” President Chace told Wesleying. “It was a tough place for me.”

“Perhaps some of the problems were of my own making,” he conceded, “but I didn’t bomb my own office.”

Back in the fall, we contacted President Chace, who left the presidency of Emory University in 2003 and now lives in California, for an interview. “Well, of course,” Chace soon replied. “But please keep in mind that I left Wesleyan in 1994, some 18 years ago, and I do not have with me records of the time. So it will be memory, all memory, a facility at once pregnant with apparent certitude and often quite erroneous.”

Cooper Union Charges Tuition, Adds Air & Water to Meal Plan

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Since 1902, The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art has remained tuition free, offering accepted students scholarships drawn in part from industrialist Peter Cooper’s epic neck beard real estate holdings and alumni contributions to cover the cost of attendance. Though Cooper Union previously rallied under the banner of an education “as free as air and water,” it seems the only banners being hoisted today are in protest of the school’s move to cover only 50% of tuition. On Tuesday, Cooper Union made it official that it would be instituting the tuition plan proposed by the university’s maligned board of directors back in December of 2012. This blog covered developments in this story at length, which included a student response in the form of a building occupation and that occupation’s inevitable conclusion, as the activism at Cooper Union clicked with the campus zeitgeist regarding Wesleyan’s own decision to discriminate against students without the means to attend Wes abandon need-blind admissions.

Click through the jump for more on what this means for those of us who also attend institutions that renege on espoused principles like inclusion and diversity.

Senior Night Out SWAG

SWAG #thisiswhy

Daniele Packard ’13 and Grace Zimmerman ’13 write in with a way for members of the Class of 2013 to legally imbibe with their classmates, promote greater access to Wesleyan in support of need blind admissions through scholarship fundraising, and enjoy some good ol’ class camaraderie out in the vibrant Middletown nightlife scene:

As graduation approaches alarmingly fast, it becomes ever more important to cherish your classmates, appreciate Wesleyan for everything it has to offer, and enjoy your dwindling time in Middletown. To this effect, the Senior Gift Committee is hosting our annual Senior Night Out, taking place this Thursday, April 25th! The four restaurants hosting SWAG for the evening are La Boca, Mondo, Iguanas Ranas and The Nest, whom have all generously agreed to offer drink and food specials for all SWAG donors this year.

Not a donor yet?  Don’t worry – there’s still time to make a gift.  Swing by any of our tabling locations this week to make a gift and pick up your wristband, or make a gift online and we’ll put the bracelet in your box. If you’ve already donated, you’ll find your wristband in your mailbox. To receive food and drink discounts you must obtain a SWAG designated wrist band. On behalf of the entire committee, we’d like to remind everyone to treat all of the establishments we visit and people we meet during the night out (and in life) with respect!

More information about drink and food specials, the night’s schedule, and tabling locations where you can pick up a wristband this week before the event!

Date: Thursday, April 25th
Time: 8 p.m. till 1 a.m.
Place: Iguanas Ranas, La Boca, Mondo, The Nest
Suggested Donation: $5

Liberating Education & Deschooling Anti-Austerity

Why are we in here and not out there? How can we reconcile the intellectual merits of the Academy with its role in perpetuating class divisions? What is the role of education in our daily lives and in society as a whole? Is struggling for need-blind enough, or do we need to go beyond offering “equal access” to alienating, repressive, and reactionary institutions?

If you’ve ever found yourself pondering these questions, this event on Saturday is a can’t-miss. Rumor has it a covert collaborator from inside the Wesleyan sociology department might make an appearance. Dan Fischer ’12 with the deets:

How can we defend our schools at the same time as we work to radically transform or even abolish them? This roundtable aims to find areas for collaboration between teachers’ union, student anti-austerity, deschooling, unschooling, horizontal pedagogy, and free school movements, among others.

12:00 – 12:30   Remarks by Daniel Long, Professor of Sociology
12:30 – 1:30     Schooling and Austerity: The Public School Dilemma
1:30 – 2:30       Unschooling: Opting Out and Overcoming Barriers to Access
                         or Resisting the Neoliberal Academy: Beyond Need Blind
2:30 – 3:30       The School-to-Prison Pipeline in CT
                         or Technology and Survelliance: Impacts on Schools
3:30 – 4:00        Open Discussion

“If we want to abolish prisons, then in a sense we’re going to have to abolish schools in the way they currently reproduce the prison and disciplinary technologies.” -Angela Davis

Whatever Happened to that Need-Blind Thing?

Zach Schonfeld ’13 is bringing it back, baby.  The topic, I mean. Not the actual thing. The topic.

Pictured: Roth answers student questions regarding need-blind at a forum in September.

Pictured: President Roth answers student questions regarding need-blind at a forum in September. Photo by Rachel Pincus ’13.

Remember way back when the campus was all talking about need-blind and stuff? Man, when was that? Oh oh, only three months ago?! Are you sure? What happened?!

Need-blind has been conspicuously absent from campus discussion lately. (I would have put a link in that last sentence but really, nobody’s talked about it much in months.) Many of need-blind’s most fervent and vocal advocates have burned out, have moved on, have grown hoarse from what seems to be a stagnant discussion. (Have forgotten?)

Fortunately, Our Most Glorious and Dear Leader Zach is having none of that. His recent article in USA Today College focuses on recent activism taking place among alumni rather than students, describing a “poignant patchwork of alumni perspectives” manifesting themselves in a plethora of petitions recently circulating amongst alumni. First there was one asking alums to withhold donations (for reasons involving sexual assault as well as need-blind), then came Lana Wilson ’05s more recent Change.org petition. Zach’s bit discusses the general alumni response, covering both sides of the donation argument and everything in between. There is also a quote from President Roth, responding to the alumni voices:

Budget Task Force Drops “Memorandum to the Community”

Six months ago, I posted that a newly conceived Student Budget Sustainability Task Force, the brainchild of WSA President Zachary Malter ’13, would be forming in the fall of 2012 and eventually articulating formal recommendations to President Roth and the Board of Trustees. Malter pieced together the concept quickly in the wake of widespread opposition to a need-aware Wesleyan.

As promised, the student-run committee has “worked extensively to evaluate the suitability of the recent move to a capped financial aid budget and need-aware admissions policy,” and the members have formulated a memorandum to the committee explaining their process thus far and the specific proposals that are under consideration. These aren’t their formal recommendations. Rather, the task force writes, “it is meant to spark conversation and debate before our final report.”

On President Malter’s request, I’m reposting the memorandum in full. You can also find it in PDF form here.