Tag Archives: new music

Cleek Schrey: Variations

cleek_schrey_event

The CFA invites you to a music recital by graduate student Cleek Schrey:

Experience graduate music student Cleek Schrey‘s realisation of John Cage’s graphic score “Variations II” for violin and six loudspeakers, alongside original compositions and improvisations.

Date: Tuesday, November 3rd
Time: 9:00pm
Place: World Music Hall (CFA)

Toneburst + Music 220 Final Concert

A concert invitation from the CFA:

Toneburst Laptop and Electronic Arts Ensemble and Music 220 (Composing, Performing, and Listening to Experimental Music) end of semester concert. An evening of music and sound installations, some with video. Works by John Bischoff, Jonathan Zorn, student composers, and more.

Toneburst Laptop and Electronic Arts Ensemble is:  Greg Hall, Zora Li, David Elkin-Ginnetti, Will Freudenheim, Min Cheol Lee, Alex Rowland, Jakob Shaw, and Wei Wang; and graduate students Hallie Blejewski, and Cleek Schrey.

Composing, Performing, and Listening to Experimental Music is: Greg Hall, Emma Broder, Nick Daley, Vivian Deng, Ben Draghi, Will Freudenheim, Laura Hess, Will King, Adam Osborne, Kate Pappas, Eric Poretsky, Eriq Robinson, Nicole Roman-Johnston, Rachel Rosenman, Jakob Shaw, Matt Weinstein, Anna Yin, and Justin Zhang

Organized by Visiting Assistant Professor of Music Jonathan Zorn and University Professor of Music Ron Kuivila, together with graduate students Dina Maccabee, Daniel Fishkin, and Peter Blasser.

Date: Friday, May 8th – tonight!
Time: 8:00pm
Place: CFA Hall

Touch Tones, TV’s, and Time—An Elegy for Debased Media

An exciting invitation to an upcoming performance:

“Touch Tones, TV’s, and Time: An Elegy for Debased Media” is an evening length work by University Professor of Music Ronald Kuivila for singing and speaking voices, live electronics, and various media past their prime. Enumeration and iteration abound in an exploration of the extent to which a listener (human or otherwise) can be trained to be entranced by the entrance of entrainment. The heterophonic kabelsalat that results includes the ring tones, dial tones, and busy signals of the world’s land lines, the Wesleyan carillon in effigy, an electro-ideological party line and an ever-present chorus lurking in a state of auditory denial.

Date: Tuesday, February 25th – tomorrow!
Time: 8:00 PM
Place: Beckham Hall
Cost: FREE!

Concert: New Works by Graduate Student Composers

Nathan Friedman MA ’14 invites you to an exciting evening of new musical works by Wesleyan graduate student composers:

Featuring new pieces by:
Peter Blasser MA ’15
Hallie Blejewski MA ’14
Jason Brogan MA ’15
Sam Dickey MA ’14
Daniel Fishkin MA ’15
Nathan Friedman MA ’14
Gabriel Kastelle MA ’14
Jasmine Lovell-Smith MA ’14
Dina Maccabee MA ’15
Cristohper Ramos Flores MA ’14
Sean Sonderegger MA ’14

Performed by loadbang:
Carlos Cordeiro, clarinets
Jeffrey Gavett, baritone
Andy Kozar, trumpet, flugelhorn
Will Lang, trombone

Date: Monday, December 9
Time: 8:00 PM – 10:00 PM
Place: CFA Hall
Cost: Free!
Facebook: Event page

BandCampWes: Orkinpod Abandons Argus Comics, Continues Music Career

BJ Lillis ’12 says this is his break-up album. The break-up is between him and Wesleyan.

Fans of the Argus’ tragically defunct comics section (guys, remember “Feet People”?) and surreal Brian Wilson-obsessed psych-pop alike should be thrilled to learn that Orkinpods, the formerly anonymous bedroom pop project of comics editor emeritus B. J. Lillis ’12, has a new album online for the new year. It’s called The Loudest Sound, and it’s also Orkinpod’s finest, most confident work yet, which is definitely saying something, considering I loved 2011’s Boardwalking, Katy Perry cover and all. While Lillis’s previous work channeled the damaged surrealism of Smiley Smile-era Beach Boys, this one reminds me more of Sunflower or Surf’s Up. Gone are the synths and drum samples from the last record; in their place, Lillis employs rich arrangements involving upright piano, violins, ukelele, “harmonicas; audion electric chord organ; pots, pans, glasses; packing-tape drums; jar-of-pennies; laundry basket; maracas and shakers; backgammon pieces; pencils; [and] effects.” The songs are also longer and more fully fledged.

From the first notes of “The Scientists Say,” The Loudest Sound is lush, richly arranged pop music, with some of Lillis’s most gorgeous harmonies and intimate lyrics yet. Listen to it alone and try not to cry. Seriously, listen to the opening track:

My other favorite is probably “What We Bury At Night,” which finds Lillis crooning in a lower register over an almost a cappella backdrop of swirling harmonies, maracas, steel guitar whines, and god knows what else.