Tag Archives: occupy

May Day Planning Meeting

May Day

Last year, roughly two dozen Wes students descended on New York on May Day to confront capitalism and the state. This year they are taking things local.

Aron Chilewich ’14 writes in with the deets:

May Day is just around the corner – who is ready to make some social revolution? The spring is here, the flowers are blooming, and anything is possible. A meeting will be held Thursday night to discuss local action. Planning is already under way and a number of exciting proposals are on the table. Lets make this May Day one to remember!

The meeting will be held General Assembly style with an agenda and facilitators in order to keep it concise and accessible. Come with proposals, ideas, and questions.

Date: Tonight, April 18th
Time: 9:30 p.m.
Location: University Organizing Center 3rd Floor, 190 High Street
Facebook: event

Discussion on Money in Politics

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From Alicia Gansley ’15:

Money in Politics: A Discussion with the Roosevelt Institute and Democracy Matters

This week the Roosevelt Institute will be partnering with Democracy Matters for a discussion on campaign finance reform. Most Americans believe that the influence of big corporate money on American elections and public policy is a problem, but what is to be done about it? Is it, in fact, a problem? How do we make American elections more just, and how do we make our democracy more “by the people”?

You can learn more about the influence of money on politics at Democracy Matters

For more information, email aedavis@wes (Amy Davis from the Roosevelt Institute) and/or agansley@wes (Alicia Gansley from Democracy Matters).

Date: Wednesday, February 20
Time: 7-8 pm
Place: Usdan couches

Cooper Union Students Occupy, Demand Free Tuition

While the struggle on campus to retain need-blind admissions rages on, students in New York City are taking things up a notch or two. Yesterday, students at the Cooper Union college in the East Village barricaded themselves inside the top floor of their main building, known as “the Clocktower”, in protest of proposed tuition charges for undergraduate students. The school has been tuition free for over a century and students claim the current administration’s plan to conflicts with the core values of the institution.

Students have armed themselves with sleeping bags and ramen noodles, vowing to stay as long as it takes until their demands for greater transparency and tuition-free education are met. The occupiers have successfully resisted at least one attempt at eviction, during which school maintenance workers attempted to force their way in using rams and drills, vowing to hold their position for “as long as it takes.” Meanwhile, dozens of supporters have rallied in solidarity on the sidewalk below, including participants from the Occupy movement and the Free University, a group that is  now conducting publicly accessible teach-ins there at no cost.

Right Freakin’ Now: Doernberg ’13 Films #OWS Anniversary

Happy first birthday, Occupy Wall Street! The movement to repair social and economic equality in America began one year ago today, when the initial occupation began in Manhattan’s Zucotti Park. A small coalition of Wes students was there that first week, with extensive Wesleying coverage appearing here and here. In the year since, Wesleyan has seen on-campus occupations, alumni (and presidential) perspectives, coverage by Ezra Silk ’10 and Rob Wohl ’11, academic discussions, student arrests, aborted Radiohead concerts, and quite a bit more.

Appropriately, a handful of Wes students are in New York right now, joining in the festivities. According to Reuters, over 100 protestors have been arrested, with at least on Wesleyan student reportedly among them. Resident livestreamer and bearded social media journalist Ben Doernberg ’13 has been livestreaming the experience all day, and you can follow along above or on U-Stream.

For more on the #OWS anniversary, here’s ongoing coverage from Slate, The Nation, and the New York Times.

Occupy Tactics: Livestream/Discussion

Daniel Plafker ’15 wants you to justify your actions:

In the runup to the one year anniversary of the Occupy Movement, we will be coming together for a discussion on diversity of tactics.

The event will begin with a live-streamed viewing of the CUNY-organized debate on Violence and Legitimacy in Occupy and Beyond between journalist Chris Hedges and B. Traven, a member of the Crimethinc. Ex-Workers’ Collective, followed by our own open discussion on tactics and the legitimacy of violence and other tactics in social movements and as tools for political change.

The event will be open to the entire Middletown community including Wesleyan students, faculty, staff, and other non-university-affiliated folks.

Bring your dinner and add your voice to the dialogue.

Time: Today, 7PM
Place: 41 Wyllys, Room 114
Face? Booked

Occupy is Occupying Wesleying. Again.

Occupy Wes:

For all the new frosh who wished they could’ve been part of all the radicalfreakinessthatwasOccupy (that is, the 1% of them not already from New York City), now’s the time to get excited. A group of students will be meeting today at 9pm in the University Organizing Center (that’s 190 High, all you youngsters) to plan a livestream viewing party/discussion for the upcoming debate between Chris Hedges and Crimethinc on “Occupy Tactics: Violence & Legitimacy in the Occupy Movement & Beyond” (planned for 9/12) as well as a trip down to NYC for the 1st anniversary of Occupy (events will be occurring from the 15th through the 17th of September).

tl;dr get your activist ass over to the UOC tonight at 9 pm.

Date: Thursday, September 6
Time: 9 pm
Place: UOC

Breaking the Mold in 2012: New Tactics for Young People’s Political Action

Watch out. They are coming.

Breaking the Mold brings together individuals who are actively involved in mobilizing young people for the 2012 election, both within and without the traditional party system. The Occupy movement has provided some momentum for youth activism, but will it continue? How will new organizations (such as Citizens’ Congress and Rootstrikers) change the activism landscape? Join our panelists as they consider the influence of young people’s participation on the 2012 election.

The panel is moderated by Gov. Prof. Sonali Chakravarti. The list of the panelists can be found after the jump.

Date: Thursday, April 26
Time: 4.30pm – 6.00pm
Place: PAC001

Insurgent Research: Looking for Autonomy in the Production of Knowledge with Social Activist and Post-Development Theorist Dr. Gustavo Esteva

Super awesome event real, real soon:

The Foucauldian challenge to the institutional production of
“truth” (the statements governing our behavior) is not coming from
universities or research centers but from social movements: insurgent
research, militant research, reflection in action…from Colectivo
Situaciones in Argentina to Unitierra in California or Chocosol in
Toronto, autonomous centers for the production of knowledge are
proliferating. Is this an ephemeral, marginal fashion? What is the
role of these centers in the current wave of mobilizations? Do they
represent alternative, valid ways of knowing?

BRING YOUR LUNCH!

Co-sponsored by the Adelphic Educational Fund, Infoshoppe Collective, Ajúa Campos,
Hermes, Occupy, Center for the Americas, LAST, Academic Affairs, the
Service Learning Center and the Sociology and Anthropology
departments.

More super awesome details after the jump.

Anti-Systemic Movements: the Zapatista Attitude

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Since Seattle, all anti-systemic movements acknowledge that the Zapatistas were the first wake-up call to react against Neoliberal Globalization. The Zapatista experience continues to be a source of inspiration everywhere. The Zapatista ¡Basta! reappeared in Occupy Wall Street as a sign of identity. Zapatismo itself can be described as an attitude. What are the nature and traits of such attitude? Can it be adopted by other movements seeking similar outcomes?
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Date: Wednesday, February 22
Time: 5 pm
Location: Career Center
Cost: Free

Ah, Journalism

Ouch.

I say as much in the close of my “Occupy Wesleyan: A Retrospective” post, but since I highly doubt many of you will make it to the end, here it is again (yes, I quote myself; I’m just that meta):

An interesting case study in how a mistake can reproduce itself: the Middletown Press reported that it was the REAL MRoth who revoked Hickenlooper’s diploma–a story that was promptly picked up by the Denver Post, where it is running on the front page of the site.

Thanks to commenters “BC” and “Colorado”!

An update: the Denver Post has since altered its article to reflect the actual events.

Luckily, we have screenshots after the jump!

Update, part deux: some do-gooder has since changed Hickenlooper’s wikipedia page, citing the Middletown Press/Denver Post articles, to reflect Roth’s supposed revocation.

Again, screenshot appears after the jump.

Updat3: And, at long last, the Middletown Press story has been changed. At least they mention their correction (vs. the Denver Post, which pretends it had it right all along)…

Also, be sure to check out the respective comments sections in the above links… they’re priceless.