Tag Archives: protest

Wesleying’s Updated Calendar of Political Rallies and Events

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Looking to get organized? To help make this easier,  Wesleying has compiled another roundup of events in NYC and Connecticut between now and the end of the year with help from other awesome calendars on the ENGAGE blog and Women’s March CT’s Twitter. Also many thanks to my woke Facebook friends who I cyber-stalked to find some of these events. Enjoy!

We want to keep this list up to date, so if you hear about any new event or know about one we missed send us the info by e-mail at  staff[at]wesleying[dot]org or through Twitter/Facebook.

VIDEO: Wesleyan Students Protest #MuslimBan at Bradley International Airport

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On Sunday afternoon, Wesleyan students joined over 1,000 protesters at Bradley International Airport in The Council on American-Islamic Relations – Connecticut‘s protest against President Trump‘s Executive Order banning Muslim immigrants from 7 countries and halting immigration from Syria.

The President signed the order at 4:42 PM on Saturday, January 28th, to the dismay of millions of people worldwide. Just before 9 PM on Saturday, a federal judge ruled to block parts of the Executive Order preventing some of those detained from being immediately deported. However, the ruling failed to free those detained as a result of the ban, leaving many travellers unable to leave the airport or government custody despite having proper green cards and visas.

Wesleyan Students Protest Dakota Access Pipeline in New Haven

Photo Credit: Liberation News

Photo Credit: Kirill Lebedev for Liberation News

On Friday afternoon, a cohort of Wesleyan activists drove down to New Haven’s financial district to protest three major banks’ investments in the Dakota Access Pipeline. Students from Wesleyan Democratic Socialists and Fossil Fuel Divest joined other protestors on the march, which began at Wells Fargo, moved to Bank of America and the Federal Courthouse, and ended at TD Bank. At each stop, organizers and indigenous activists made speeches and led chants demanding a halt to pipeline construction and that the banks divest from the project. Read past the jump for more information about the march and specific calls to action from the protest’s organizers.

Guest Post: “Why We Decided to Write ‘Amerikkka’ On an Upside Down Flag”

“Burning and defacing the flag is a critique of what American patriotism and the American flag represent.”

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On Friday, hundreds of Wesleyan students took part in a multi-stage demonstration that featured testimonies and chants from perspectives ranging from staunchly anti-State to “final stands” of full blown Trump supporters.

The second stage of the demonstration saw students gathered outside of Olin library and several among the crowd ascending the steps to communicate their response to the election results. During this part of the demonstration, we posted a live Facebook video of Yael Horowitz ’17 and Abby Cunniff ’17 spray painting “Amerikkka” on an upside down American flag. The video now has over 22,000 views and 142 shares. Many comments on the video declare their hatred for Wesleyan students, and several have been explicitly threatening and violent. We are posting the following guest submission so that they protesters can explain their motivations. The following views are the writers’ own.

Hundreds of Wes Students March To Main Street to Protest Trump

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Hundreds of Wesleyan students gathered on Friday for a rally and demonstration against the presidential election of Donald Trump. Like many similar college protests across the country, the goal of the “Students Against Trump” rally was to express discontent with the American electoral system, as well as the systematic racism, sexism, homophobia, and xenophobia that led to Trump’s rise to power.

The day saw many students vocalizing their response to the election results, a march throughout campus and down to Main Street, 2 students being detained by Middletown Police, and several students spray-painting “Amerikkka” on an American flag in front of Olin. Read on for photos and videos from the day’s actions, as well as more on what transpired:

Wes Students Join Area Residents in Action Against Dakota Access Pipeline

“Our politicians are turning a blind eye to the protesters and to the native peoples as a new tyranny of oil is taking over our government” – Josh Nodiff ’19

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On Friday, September 9, Dragonfly Climate Collective, a local anti-capitalist environmental justice group, organized an action outside of TD Bank on Washington Street to protest the bank’s investment in the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL). Over 125 people from Wesleyan, Middletown, and greater Connecticut area turned out in response to a call for solidarity actions from the Camp of the Sacred Stones and the Red Warrior Camp, the two camps that have been leading the resistance against the DAPL. The Dragonfly Climate Collective report on the action can be found here.

Black Lives Matter // Shut Middletown Down

Wesleyan Students at a "Die In" on the corner of Wash and Main. Photo by James Gibbel '18

Wesleyan Students at a “Die In” on the corner of Wash and Main. Photo by James Gibbel ’18

At 3 PM, a huge number of students, faculty, staff, administrators, and Middletown community members (estimates range from a few to several hundred) gathered in the Exley Lobby ready to march in solidarity with the #BlackLivesMatter movement. Although most folks dissipated at about 4 PM after the stream of protestors made it’s way back to main campus, as of 4:45 PM there are still students marching on the North End of Main Street and police are present. Prior to the march, protestors were reminded that a Black life is taken every 28 hours by law enforcement or state-backed vigilantes; this march was an attempt to disrupt the Middletown economy in analogous fashion to the constant disruption of Black lives. In addition, it was emphasized that this was a peaceful protest.

Students Publish Disorientation Guide to Activism at Wes

 

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So maybe you’re a freshman, nervous and overwhelmed by all the information coming at you about classes, housing, what to bring from home – and are feeling like you can’t even begin to think about bigger issues on campus. Or maybe you’re a senior and feel like you’ve gotten this far and never really involved yourself in any social/political engagement on campus, so now it’s way too late and where would you even begin if you wanted to. Wherever you might stand, activism at Wes can seem like a huge, widespread and unnavigable thing.

Thankfully, some very committed students are trying to change that sentiment and make activism within the Wesleyan world an approachable and cohesive community. This past week, the Disorientation Guide was released through the University Organizing Center site to bring together the wide-ranging issues affecting us into one document. The entire Disorientation zine can be downloaded here, and I strongly recommend that everyone take a look at it.

BREAKING: #AFAMisWhy is Marching on Wesleyan

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Beginning at noon today from the Science Library, students have been marching across campus in protest of the administration’s lack of support for African American Studies. This comes at the heels of a massive petition campaign, where other members of the Wesleyan community were encouraged to add their names to a resolution calling for the Provost to prioritize faculty hires in AFAM, to fill the empty lines that are in AFAM currently, as well as demanding a response from President Roth or Provost Ruth Striegel Weissman.

This resolution previously passed the Wesleyan Student Assembly on May 4th, when the WSA decided to suspend their bylaws (in which they are not allowed to vote on a resolution introduced that same day) to vote on the resolution the day of. The resolution passed unanimously and within a week’s time, has garnered over 850 additional signatures from the community.

The March today, entitled “March on Wesleyan,” moved from SciLi into Olin, then across Foss, through Admissions and Usdan, then through North College and ending at South College. Along the way, everyone chanted various phrases, as well as singing the following version of the fight song:

Students & Goliath Screening with Filmmaker Alex Leff

Maya McDonnell ’16 invites you to a film screening:

The world faces accelerated climate catastrophe. If the fossil fuel industry has the most to gain – the youth have the most to lose.
But as the fossil fuel industry profits, students nationwide are taking on the fossil fuel industry head on. Based in Amherst, Massachusetts, Students & Goliath follows the divestment campaigns of five schools: Amherst College, Hampshire College, Mt. Holyoke College, Smith College, and the University of Massachusetts. Eight students lockdown and are arrested inside an energy company’s office to protest a devastating pipeline proposal. 40,000 gather in Washington, DC to demand action. Students & Goliath is the story of a generation waking up, becoming empowered, and taking the climate crisis into their own hands.

Come watch the film, meet the director Alex Leff, and join Wes, Divest for a discussion about the fossil fuel divestment movement!

Date: Saturday, November 9
Time: 7:30 PM – 9:00 PM
Place: PAC 002