Tag Archives: Queens

Unofficial Orientation Series 2018: Queer Life

 This post is an updated version of Sam’s update of his 2016 article, because “heterenormativity is [still] killing this country.” 

Taken from the 2017 Showtunes Sideways performance. Showtunes Sideways is a musical cabaret that opens up a space for those to perform roles in songs from musicals which they wouldn’t traditionally be cast in. PC Maia Nelles Sager ’17

This is part of our 2018 Unofficial Orientation Series. A quick reminder that you can check out the welcome post here and past years’ series here.

 

Hello, sweet sweet children! This post is here for all of my children of the rainbow to get a sense of what it is like to be a Queer identifying person on campus. This is a revamped version of the post I wrote last year (which you can find ~here~). Now that I’ve gotten a bit more experience under my belt at Wes (I’m going to be a Junior. Ik. I’m so old), I thought it was fair to update my general feeling on The Community™ at Wes. On top of my general experiences, this post will also contain some resources that are here for all LGBTQIA+ bbys.

 

Unofficial Orientation Series 2017: Queer Life

“Heteronormativity is killing this country”

Taken from the 2017 Showtunes Sideways performance. Showtunes Sideways is a musical cabaret that opens up a space for those to perform roles in songs from musicals which they wouldn’t traditionally be cast in. PC Maia Nelles Sager ’17

This is part of our 2017 Unofficial Orientation Series. A quick reminder that you can check out the welcome post here and past years’ series here.

Hello sweet sweet children! This post is here for all of my children of the rainbow to get a sense of what it is like to be a Queer identifying person on campus. This is a revamped version of the post I wrote last year (which you can find ~here~). Now that I’ve gotten a bit more experience under my belt at Wes (I’m going to be a Junior. Ik. I’m so old), I thought it was fair to update my general feeling on The Community™ at Wes. On top of my general experiences, this post will also contain some resources that are here for all LGBTQIA+ bbys.

Off the bat, I’m gonna let you in on a secret: It’s not easy being queer. Shocker, right? As a community we face hardships that many do not have to deal with, and that is no exception at Wesleyan. People can still be annoying af to deal with, but overall this is a community of care and support and people want to see you blossom into the beautiful and radiant Queen you are meant to be. As you read on, please be aware that these are my personal feelings and experiences, and I definitely am not trying to speak for a whole group of people through this post.

“Peter Pan Meets the Man Cave”: New York Times on Astoria Bro-Pad

“I think the secret to our success is that we don’t think too much about the future.”

If, like me, you’re graduating in less than a year and, like me, you’re not entirely thrilled about the subsequent “growing up” trajectory, feast your cursor upon a new kingdom: “Fortress Astoria.”

Last week, the New York Times’ Hilary Howard devoted a fascinating and (I hate this word) charming feature piece to four best friends who are also roommates: Danaher Dempsey, Luke Crane, Rick Brown and Shyaporn Theerakulstit. They met as students at NYU. Through a role-playing group. (Not the same group that always steals my table at Think Coffee, I hope.) In 1991. Which means they’re all pushing 40.

Which means they’ve been living together, as bachelorsor “roommates,” if you will—for over 18 years. And while their story doesn’t pertain to Wesleyan in any direct way, it is a fascinating portrait that certainly pertains to college life in general, the transition into the Great Beyond, and why sociologists now say post-college life no longer has to suck.  Read on if you care.

New Yawkers Tawk Wee’d

Jersey Shore = WesleyanIn today’s New York Times WesMention column, a Wesleyan alumna is quoted in an article about people attempting to get rid of their New York accents.  Read for yourself:

Lauren LoGiudice sought help for similar symptoms. “I would have sessions and I started to cry,” she said

[…]

Miss LoGiudice’s accent didn’t matter when she was growing up in Howard Beach, a heavily Italian neighborhood in Queens where dropping r’s in words like doctor (doctuh) and water (wawtuh) just happens to be the way many people talk.

[…]

“I grew up with people who could be the cast of ‘Jersey Shore,’ ” Miss LoGiudice, 27, said. It was not until she got to Wesleyan University that she realized how much her speech pigeonholed her. And as a young actress who is “tall and Anglican-looking,” she worried her accent would be a roadblock. “If I had looked like Meadow Soprano,” Miss LoGiudice said, “I wouldn’t have had to worry about my accent.”

From my experience, there’s still people with somewhat of an “heavily Italian neighborhood in Queens” accent around, though rarer than ever.