Tag Archives: rant

Who the Fuck Decides That This Is Okay?

Hidden in the back is a bowl full of half-eaten buffalo wings.

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You may have seen this on Twitter already, but it took me a while to find time to write this and I am still fucking pissed off. I see this almost every time I walk through Usdan. It’s not just this table, either. By the time Late Night rolls around, the carpet is littered with abandoned bits of food, napkins, silverware. It’s gross, but that’s not really the point: who the fuck is supposed to clean that shit up? Bon Appetit? Nope. Sun Services? Nope. You? Abso-fuckin-lutely.  I am going to start photographing this crap every time and at some point I will make a gallery of it on Wesleying under the same title. I apologize in advance for the liberal use of the second person.

There are so many things wrong with this picture. (It’s a little blurry, for one.) Dare I enumerate them?

1. The Disrespect: Do you really think that these members of our community, the service-people, are so fucking beneath you that you can’t be bothered to pick up the shit you drop on the floor, or take your plate twenty feet to the dishroom conveyor belt? Grow the fuck up.

Valentine’s Day Post-Mortem, Part One: In Defense of Valentine’s Day

Or, “Why You Are Actually In Love and Just Didn’t Realize It”

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Yes, that’s President Roth ’78 gazing up at Clark Hall longingly in 1977.

Valentine’s Day seems to have gone out of fad. It’s a day to bemoan, moan, eat chocolate, buy into or cynically quip about commercialization of holidays, and generally feel bad about another year having gone by without finding that special someone.

But it’s time to give Valentine’s Day the justice it deserves.

Wesleyan is awash in couple celebration today. Wesleyan University Facebook posts like this, for “Love Bugs” alumni to tell their couple story, and Argus articles like this and this, about what to do if you are single or in a couple on Valentine’s Day, or Argus polls about nominating the sexiest single are symptoms of obsessive culture around a single/couple dichotomy. At a campus where we like to toss around words like “messing up the heteronormative patriarchy,” maybe we could turn an eye to the relationship one.

Because even if you’re not in love with someone, or even if your love is missing reciprocation, Valentine’s Day is a day to celebrate all of the love—all of it. It can be a day to honor, celebrate, and proudly blast the stereo over your head for the love that does not fit perfectly into the typical monogamous couple picture we all seem to be myopically stuck on. If your life does not match coupledom, you have not failed—you can still be happy, and it does not mean that you are out of love. If your life does, there are still some unconventional love valentines to be given out this year.

From the Argives: A Friendly Reminder to Get Over Yourself

In a misguided attempt to avoid cope with the prospect of finals, I found myself flipping through decades of old December Argus issues.  While I didn’t find any especially enlightening advice from past Wes generations on how to deal with the stress of Reading Week, I did find this gem of a column from December 6, 1977:

The writer begins by making an observation that is just as accurate today as it was 35 years ago—that conversations between acquaintances here always center on the same questions.  “How was your summer?” “What classes are you taking?” And so on and so forth.

The column quickly evolves into a rant on the “destructively self-indulgent” nature of one particular conversation-starter, one that always comes up around this time of the year: “How’s your work going?”

The conversation generated by this question has a certain quality of desperation about it which only serves to reinforce the already desperate atmosphere which characterizes Wesleyan in December…Furthermore, as with the other automatic questions that get asked here, reading week questions are boring! Do you actually remember even one out of the ten workloads you hear described? Do you remember who has it rough and who hasn’t? Do you care?

Well, do you? The next time you have an urge to complain about your workload, or to ask someone else about theirs, instead think about exchanging accounts of how many hours you’ve spent procrastinating. Or just lock yourself in Olin for a few hours, away from the rest of humanity, and waste time looking through old Argus issues.

Read the full column after the jump.