Tag Archives: short stories

First Times: An Interview

Continuing the trend of my former roommates’ undertaking cool extra-curricular projects, Maxwell Bevilacqua ’12 has plans to publish First Times, a collection of short pieces on firsts (not just of the sexual variety — though sharing those stories is strongly encouraged). Good news if you missed the deadline the last time we featured this project: he’s still seeking submissions. Want more details? Here’s a brief gchat interview I held with Max last week.

Wesleying: So, Max, what’s this I’ve been hearing about something called First Times? Does it have anything to do with Wescam?

Maxwell Bevilacqua: Wescam might have something to do with first times but First Times, a collection of short stories I’m putting together, probably has nothing to do with Wescam

(I can still be found as a graduate student btw)

W: A collection of short stories you’re putting together, huh? Sounds like Stethoscope Press. Is that true? I should add that I’m not exactly sure what Stethoscope is.

MB: This is not a stethoscope press publication (though the wonderful Piers Gelly ‘13 gave me some great advice) but it is an independent, supa creative, trendy thing I’m doing just like Stethoscope Press

and hey – you should see a doctor for that!! 

Back by Popular Demand: Etgar Keret Presents Jellyfish

jellyfish_xlgLast here in 2011, award-winning filmmaker and writer Etgar Keret is back this time to speak about his 2008 film, Jellyfish. Emily Brown ’12, coordinator for special events and intern for the Center for Film Studies, gives us the details:

This film, directed by the husband-and-wife team of Etgar Keret and
Shira Geffen, tells the story of three women in Israel whose lives
intersect in increasingly profound ways. The film, which won the
Camera d’Or at the 2008 Cannes Film Festival, will be followed by a
Q&A with Keret.

This event is co-sponsored by the Jewish and Israeli Studies
department and the Film Studies department.

Date: Tuesday, April 23rd
Time: 8:00-10:00 PM
Place: Center for Film Studies
Cost: Free