Tag Archives: spring fling committee

Join Spring Fling Committee

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From Rachie Weisberg ’15

Wanna help plan Spring Fling, book artists, and have unadulterated access to the most top-secret listserv on campus? You’re interested in Spring Fling Committee (the artist formally known as Social Committee), not Concert Committee.

Spring Fling Committee remains a committee like any other,  which happens to exert massive control over one of the biggest campus events of the year and funding thereof. Its application process is open to the student body, its selection process based on experience and merit. Those unhappy with the Spring Fling booking process would do well to take note: here’s the opportunity to get involved.

Spring Fling is an all-campus outdoor concert that happens on Foss Hill every May. In the past, artists like Tune-Yards, The Dirty Projectors, KENDRICK, and TV on the Radio have come to rock out Wesleyan’s student body. Spring Fling Committee works throughout the year to put together a multiple-act show that brings the most current and enjoyable bands to campus in an effort to please the entire student body.

SPRING FLING 2014: JUICE / JUICE/ JUICE

“Concerts on Foss: now more than ever!”

Word gets out pretty easily, so I’m basically just confirming what many of you already know. Here’s the Spring Fling 2014 Line-up, courtesy of Spring Fling Committee:

CHANCE THE RAPPER
TUNE-YARDS
S-TYPE

This year’s lineup still follows the loosely defined Spring Fling template of “rap act, indie-ish buzz band, raucous opening act” of the past few years, allowing us to reuse this sentence again and again. Some quick overviews and music from the artists are after the jump.

Apply to Battle of the Bands

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From Social Spring Fling Committee and Jack Black’s double chin:

Battle of the Bands will take place Friday, April 18 at Eclectic. The annual event, which determines the student opener for Spring Fling on May 8, will be accepting submissions for the next two weeks! If your band would like a chance to play, please submit 2 demos and/or live videos to jewald(at)wesleyan(dot)edu with the subject line “I Wanna Battle and Here is My Band.” Submissions are due Saturday, April 12th at 4pm.

Also if you are interested in being a judge for Battle of the Bands, please submit your answers to the following questions, also to jewald(at)wesleyan(dot)edu with the subject line, “I Wanna Judge Your Bands.” If you are selected, you are required to stay for the entire show and judge objectively.

  • Name/Class Year
  • Why do you want to be a judge for Battle of the Bands?
  • What is your favorite concert you’ve seen at Wesleyan and why?

Deadline: Saturday, April 12th at 4pm
Contact: jewald(at)wesleyan(dot) edu

Apply to the Spring Fling Committee – Application Due Tomorrow!

spring-fling-2010

Courtesy of Rachie Weisberg ’15:

Wanna help plan Spring Fling, book artists, and have unadulterated access to the most top-secret listserv on campus? You’re interested in Spring Fling Committee (the artist formally known as Social Committee), not Concert Committee (remember Concert Committee handles money, we handle the students of Wesleyan). Anyway, Spring Fling Committee remains a committee like any other, which happens to exert massive control over one of the biggest campus events of the year and funding thereof.

In case you’re confused, Spring Fling is an all-campus outdoor concert that happens on Foss Hill every May. In the past, artists like The Dirty Projectors, KENDRICK LAMAR, and TV on the Radio have come perform for Wesleyan’s student body. Spring Fling Committee works throughout the year to put together a multiple-act show that brings the most current and enjoyable bands to campus in an effort to please the entire student body.

Its application process is open to the student body, its selection process based on experience and merit. If you were unhappy with last year’s booking process, or are a frosh and just want to be part of a group that has soooo much power, here’s the opportunity to get involved for the 2013-2014 school year: please answer the questions past the jump (either in an email or an attached word document) and submit them to Elisa Cardona (ecardona[at]wesleyan[dot]edu) by Monday, September 9th.

Who Killed Spring Fling’s Vibe?

The title of this post is not meant rhetorically. It’s a serious question: who killed Spring Fling’s vibe?

Was it the student attendees, some inebriated and inconsiderate, who jumped over the barrier when the floor of the rink was at capacity and allegedly behaved drunkenly and belligerently when asked to back up? (“Some students ought to be ashamed of themselves,” observed a witness who asked to remain anonymous.) Was it the massive security detail (Public Safety and CSC) who guarded every nook and cranny with the graveness of airport TSA agents and reportedly physically abused one student and verbally harassed another? Was it the organizers (Spring Fling Committee or otherwise) who neglected to inform students in advance that they would be turned away if they arrived late, even while other students were visibly exiting, and flipped on the lights shortly before Ab-Soul’s set, possibly to punish students for failing to obey orders that were largely unintelligible over the ice rink’s cavernous din? Or was it the fucking weather, or maybe Spurrier-Snyder Rink itself, which has never seemed like a less suitable venue for a free, unticketed performance by one of the fastest rising rappers in the world in 2013? At least it wasn’t Kendrick Lamar, who, despite subpar conditions and acoustics better suited to a high school gym, performed “Bitch, Don’t Kill My Vibe,” “Money Trees,” and other highlights from Good Kid, M.A.A.D City with admirable energy and charisma, wooing throngs of adoring fans who knew precisely how to yell out “Drank!” or “Ya bish!” on cue and reportedly popping over to Warren after the show, decked out in a Wes sweatshirt.

Ice Rink To Be Converted Into Swimming Pool Full of Liquor for Kendrick

Just kidding, there’s no alcohol allowed at Spring Fling again. Sorry.

The bad news, as you know by now if you’ve glanced at your inbox in the last few hours, is that Spring Fling has officially been rained out and moved to the ice rink for the second year in a row. According to my forecast, there’s a 65% chance of thunderstorms tomorrow, but even if that 35% chance proves true, Andrus is already a Woodstock-like puddle of mud from today’s downfall. Meanwhile, it’s been nothing but 75 and sunny for the last week until today, because of course it has.

The good news is that the rain might actually wash away my fucking pollen allergies for good if Spring Fling gets rained out next year there will hardly be any students who even remember that it was once a thing on Foss in the first place. The other good news is that Spring Fling Committee has managed to up the floor capacity on the rink, given that far more students are probably going to make the trek for this year’s lineup than did last time around:

Spring Fling Committee Starts Charging Money for Guest Passes, Because Kendrick

“A Kendrick ticket alone at a normal concert is going to cost about twice this price, so it’s a good steal.”

In a move that has pissed off a few students and stunned no one, Spring Fling Committee has begun charging money for guest passes, which have been bumped from $0 to $20 faster than you can say “Cooper Union’s tuition.” The news matter-of-factly popped up on this blog last Tuesday, in a post by killofrights (who, I should disclose, is a member of Spring Fling Committee):

Guest passes for non-students are now on sale at the Usdan box office. Tickets cost $20, and there is a limit of one guest ticket per student. You can charge it right to your student account. Get ‘em while you can, because guest passes will sell out.

Readers were quick to point out that no one has ever had to pay for guest passes in previous years, a fact slyly obscured by the committee’s announcement, and besides, Spring Fling Committee is just a bunch of evil hipster goons who probably wear sunglasses indoors. Everyone knows that.

According to co-chair Dylan “Dreamhost” Bostick ’13, the committee had to go above and beyond its original budget to snag this year’s lineup.

Guest Post: Yes, It Is a Problem That There Is Not a Single Woman in the Spring Fling Lineup

Bernstein ’13, a senior and former member of Spring Fling Committee, reflects on male domination in the Wesleyan music scene—and how it can be changed.

Riot grrrl supergroup Wild Flag performs at Eclectic in October 2011. Photo by Rachel Pincus ’13.

Ally Bernstein ’13 offers a critical view on the 2013 Spring Fling lineup, weighing in on an argument that appeared in the comments section of Thursday night’s announcement post:

As I struggle to match words to my experience, I recall the last time someone wrote an article critical of the gender imbalance in the Wesleyan music scene. Avery Trufelman ’13 wrote a Wespeak in 2010 in response to our general feelings of malaise as well as an upsetting incident of sexual assault at a Titus Andronicus concert. And while she wrote it during the beginning of our sophomore year, as a senior, I wonder how much has changed. At the recent, excellent Potty Mouth concert in the WestCo Café, an overwhelmingly male audience turned out to watch four punk ladies from Northampton churn out sweetly melodic lo-fi tunes. Spring Fling Committee is 72% male. The Spring Fling lineup is 100% male. The majority of campus bands are still male.

Since the Potty Mouth show, I’ve tried to figure out why. Why don’t more female Wesleyan students attend shows, and why don’t more female Wesleyan students play shows? Why are women not engaged by what Wesleyan has to offer? In 2012 I visited a friend living in Olympia, Washington, birthplace of riot grrrl and home base of Kathleen Hanna, who spoke at Wesleyan in 2010. I attended a show at my friend’s house, and every single band out of the four that played had at least one non-male member. Many had more. Not only did these ladies kill it, but the atmosphere in the crowded living room was electric. Men and women and non-binary folks were all feeding off the positive energy of dedicated people making good music. During that trip, I sat in on some band practices where people of all genders were collaborating and sharing and just figuring things out. The attitude was infectious.