Tag Archives: storm nemo

Classes Won’t Meet This Afternoon, Either

Rejoice! You called it, lesanjuan. Bill Holder has the full announcement:

Wesleyan is closed Monday, and classes will not be held this afternoon. Parking on campus remains limited, and a number of buildings are not yet accessible. Only essential personnel should report to work today. We are hopeful that classes will be held tomorrow, but that depends on how much snow removal gets done today. Our crews are working tirelessly, and we are very grateful for their dedication and good work. We will provide an update this evening around 6 pm.

Heavy equipment is in use, so students should continue to exercise considerable caution outdoors. Call Public Safety for help with storm-related matters, (860) 685-2345. For emergencies, call (860) 685-3333.

According to President Roths latest blog post, “I am hopeful that enough classroom buildings will be fully accessible so that we can get underway tomorrow (Tuesday). We will make another announcement at around 6 pm this evening.” Mayor Drew’s plan is to have the roads be passable by midnight just keep on plowing until he can’t plow anymore, so stay tuned.

As an aside, this Snow Day is an excellent opportunity to set to work on your Michael Roth Snow Sculpture Contest submission.

Classes Cancelled Tomorrow Morning (and Maybe Afternoon, Too?) Because Blizzard

In semi-related news, Espwesso remains closed tonight.

As Nemo the Hyperblizzard progresses into its extended third act on campus, the administration has opted to cancel all classes tomorrow morning, and this time it’s for real. Straight from the Holder’s (that’s Bill Holder’s) mouth:

Classes will not be held Monday morning, and we will assess campus conditions in the morning to determine whether to resume classes at noon. Administrative staff should not come to work on Monday, except for essential personnel. We will provide an update to the campus community at about 9 a.m.

Hard working ground crews have made substantial progress today – and they deserve our thanks – but more remains to be done to ensure that sidewalks are clear and buildings are accessible. Students should continue to exercise considerable caution outdoors and call Public Safety for help with storm-related matters, (860) 685-2345. For emergencies, call (860) 685-3333.

Considering Middletown remains a surreal maze of waist-high snow drifts and Governor Malloy just asked all nonessential employees to stay home Monday, this move comes as little surprise. But couldn’t they have just made the call for the whole day at once?

Acts of Heroism in a Snowpocalypse

The view from Senior Fauver, as photographed by Tuna yesterday afternoon.

The view from Senior Fauver, as photographed by Tuna yesterday afternoon.

This morning we received in our tipbox an account, from an anonymous reader, of a rather heroic rescue that took place late last night, during blizzard conditions:

Last night, a bunch of my friends and I saw a figure muddling through the blizzard. He collapsed in the snow, and did not get up. Julia Holewinski ’15, wearing just a sweater, immediately ran outside and hauled the man inside with some difficulty. He was clearly extremely intoxicated, and his eyelashes were frozen solid. We think his name is [removed] (class of ’14). If Julia hadn’t had the presence of mind and physical strength to drag him inside, he probably would have died in a snowdrift.

Besides applauding Holewinski for her courageous rescue, this seems like an opportune time to remind you that if you feel the need to get wasted during blizzard conditions (which is all fine and good), drink responsibly and don’t go wading through snow alone at night. If you spot an obviously smashed friend attempting to stumble home alone through snow drifts and heavy winds, walk with them or offer them your couch. Sorry to get all mom on you all of a sudden.

Speaking of snow rescues, pyrotechnics post this morning noted that some students (especially in Lo-Rise) are quite literally unable to open their front doors because of the Alaskan-style snow drifts.