Tag Archives: students for justice in palestine

Film Series: Divine Intervention

2002. Palestine et al. Dir: Elia Suleiman. With Suleiman, Manal Khader. 92 min.


In the spirit of Keaton and Tati, Suleiman’s wry silent-comedy performance anchors a very “loud” situation: the day-to-day life of Palestinians in Israeli-controlled territory. Subtitled “A Chronicle of Love and Pain,” the movie plays out a series of darkly funny and visually whimsical vignettes. Co-sponsored by Students for Justice in Palestine.

Tonight / 8 p.m. / Goldsmith Family Cinema / Free

Real Talk: Expulsion, Occupation, and Demolition

Fromsjpevent  Henry Prine ’18:

Meet Palestinians from Susiya and Umm al-Khair, West Bank. Join Fatma,
Hamoudi, Aysar, Eid, Nima, and Sadin for a conversation about their
lives in Palestine. They are not academics. They are living in
undocumented villages in the South Hebron Hills. These villages are
located in Area C, the part of the West Bank under full Israeli
control since 1993.

Expelled from their original land, Susiya, in 1986, these Palestinians
have been under constant threat of demolition by the state of Israel.
People stay up every night in case Caterpillar bulldozers ride up
accompanied by soldiers. Come listen to their stories, and join the
conversation that even a US Senator has. They are excited to meet you.

There will be food served. Thai food. Facebook event:
https://www.facebook.com/events/1724225127807536/)

Date: Wednesday, September 30
Time: 4:15-6:00 PM
Place: Allbritton 103

Students for Justice in Palestine – General Interest Meeting

sjpHave questions about Israel or Palestine? Want to apply a human rights lens to ending the occupation? Please join us for a general information session about Students for Justice in Palestine. All are encourage to come, regardless of any level of prior knowledge. We will go over a brief history of Palestinian activism on campus, as well as discuss plans for this year, both in terms of education and movement building.

 

Date: Tuesday, September 29 — today!
Time: 6:30-8 PM
Place: University Organizing Center
FB event

“Where Should the Birds Fly?” Screening + Discussion with Director Fida Qishta

From the lovely Tedra James ’18:

As a part of Israeli Apartheid Week (Feb. 26th – Mar. 5th), come join Wesleyan Students For Justice in Palestine in welcoming Palestinian Filmmaker Fida Qishda.

Wesleyan Students For Justice in Palestine will be hosting a screening and post-discussion of “Where Should the Birds Fly?”, a film that documents the separate stories and shared experiences of two women who survived Israel’s Operation Cast Lead: 11-year-old Mona Al Samouni who spends the film trying to make sense of her intense experiences and Fida Qishta who began her film making as a wedding videographer before quickly moving to work with international human rights observers in Gaza.

In addition to following the lives of these two women, “Where Should the Birds Fly?” visually tells the story of the efforts of Gazans to live and work under conditions of siege, and to maintain their humanity amidst the impact of military attack.

Watch the trailer here.

Date: TONIGHT! February 27
Time: 8-10 PM
Place: PAC 001

[UPDATED] Wes Drops Sabra: Stirring up the Hummus

Update (12/9/14 12:13PM):  The WSA Dining Committee has released the following statement based on developments over the weekend:

As many people on and off campus are aware, Wesleyan recently switched from stocking Sabra hummus to a local brand, Cedar’s. Though we made this change in the interest of sustainability and reducing our carbon footprint, it unfortunately has been misinterpreted  in the media and elsewhere as a political statement in support of the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) movement against Israel. In order to clarify our continued political neutrality, and to give students a choice, we will be stocking both Sabra and Cedar’s hummus, starting in January.

Obviously, this is big news that counteracts the political/ethical implications of destocking Sabra hummus. Given that this is the first notice of these changes, we have no statement from those involved in the campaign to remove Sabra, as of yet. We will update this article again with any further developments.

Update (12/9/14 7:08PM): A statement has been released by Yael Horowitz ’17, Students for Justice in Palestine, and “another group of concerned students”:

We are extremely disappointed in the University’s decision to put Sabra Hummus back on the shelves.  It is not an ethical response, but is instead motivated by public relations and the opinions of President Michael Roth.  Student opinion is against Israeli apartheid and occupation, and we will continue to make this known.  This is not the end of the conversation.

Mizrahi Mothers Wrapped in the Flag: Ultra-Nationalism, Apartheid, and the Divinity of Bureaucracy in Israel

Mizrahi Mother

Professor J. Kehaulani Kauanui writes in:

Israeli anthropologist Smadar Lavie will be delivering a talk about her new book, Wrapped in the Flag of Israel: Mizrahi Single Mothers and Bureaucratic Torture (Berghahn Books, 2014). The project explores the relationship between Mizrahi social protest movements in the State of Israel, violence in Gaza, protest movements in the surrounding Islamic World, and the possibility of further conflicts between Israel and the Palestinians, or Israel and its Arab neighbor states.

Smadar Lavie is a scholar in residence at the Beatrice Bain Research Group, UC Berkeley’s critical feminist research center, and is also a visiting professor at the Institute for Social Science in the 21st Century University College Cork. She is the author of The Poetics of Military Occupation, receiving the Honorable Mention of the Victor Turner Award for Ethnographic Writing, and co-editor of Displacement, Diaspora, and Geographies of Identity. She is the winner of the American Studies Association’s 2009 Gloria Anzaldúa Prize and the recipient of the 2013 “Heart at East” Honor Plaque for service on behalf of Mizrahi communities in the State of Israel.

This event is funded by the Department of Anthropology & Wesleyan Students for Justice in Palestine, and is co-sponsored by the Middle Eastern Studies program, along with the New Haven chapter of Jewish Voice for Peace.

This event is free and open to the public, and is wheelchair accessible.

  • Date: Tomorrow, Monday, November 17, 2014
  • Time: 4:30pm – 6:00pm
  • Place: Judd Hall, Rm. 116
  • Facebook: Event

Students Publish Disorientation Guide to Activism at Wes

 

disorientation

So maybe you’re a freshman, nervous and overwhelmed by all the information coming at you about classes, housing, what to bring from home – and are feeling like you can’t even begin to think about bigger issues on campus. Or maybe you’re a senior and feel like you’ve gotten this far and never really involved yourself in any social/political engagement on campus, so now it’s way too late and where would you even begin if you wanted to. Wherever you might stand, activism at Wes can seem like a huge, widespread and unnavigable thing.

Thankfully, some very committed students are trying to change that sentiment and make activism within the Wesleyan world an approachable and cohesive community. This past week, the Disorientation Guide was released through the University Organizing Center site to bring together the wide-ranging issues affecting us into one document. The entire Disorientation zine can be downloaded here, and I strongly recommend that everyone take a look at it.

The College Bubble: A Higher Ed Round-Up

Elizabeth Warren continues to be a powerful force in the campaign to fix the student loan system. Warren spoke at a recent hearing for the Health, Education, Labor & Pensions committee, saying that although the  interest rate necessary to cover the cost of the student loan program without making a profit would be about 2.5%, the government is charging students nearly twice that amount for undergraduate loans, and even more for graduate and direct loans.  But Warren has come under fire from critics who say that the figures she is using in her argument are wrong.

In the follow-up to the controversy surrounding the suspension of Northeastern‘s chapter of Students for Justice in Palestine by the school, 

The College Bubble: A Higher Ed Round-Up

The recent news that a Wesleyan student is suing Psi  U due to rape allegations has sparked debate over the role of fraternities in sexual assault, and their presence on college campuses. Zach Schonfeld ’13 has written two in-depth articles on the matter. The first explores the history of various universities that have decided to get rid of their fraternities, and the follow-up wondering if Wesleyan will be the next to do the same.

A recent piece in The Nation explores the worrying fate of publically engaged academic intellectuals in the university system, reflecting on the recent firings of two Columbia professors.

Students Call on WSA to Not Divest from Israel

unnamed-7We posted last week about a Students for Justice in Palestine petition that called on the Wesleyan Student Assembly (WSA) to divest from companies that profit from or contribute to the occupation of Palestinian territories. Since then, there’s been a petition circulating by J Street U urging the WSA not to divest in order to facilitate the current round of negotiations between Israel and Palestine. You can read this petition below and sign here if interested:

Recently, a petition has circulated among students and alumni calling on the Wesleyan Student Assembly (WSA) to divest its endowment from Israel as a response to the ongoing Israeli-Palestinian conflict. While the undersigned agree with the urgent need to resolve the conflict and end Israel’s occupation of the Palestinian Territories, we believe that a boycott of Israel is at best ineffective, and likely a counter-productive response to this conflict.