Tag Archives: watch

WATCH Presents: As Seen On TV

2000px-As_seen_on_TV.svgMAKE YOUR OWN EPISODE OF TV

Have you ever thought that ending of LOST was the worst? Like, “I can do better than that” worst? And they killed the mother! Wait, nevermind. Anyway, here’s your shot! Starting this semester, alternative theatre group WATCH is hosting an event where students have the chance to write, act in, or direct an original episode of their favorite TV show. Students will submit scripts of an episode of a TV show, and then work with a writer’s room where interested parties will help design the program. Directors will have one week to stage one of the scripts. And finally, the episodes are brought to life in front of an audience!

Dates: Submission for writers is Nov. 6th and actors/directors will be needed in subsequent weeks (stay tuned!)

Contact us at: emaskin[at]wesleyan[dot]edu

Submission Deadline: Friday, November 6

Complete Video: Panel on Guns and Gun Violence

Back in February, just before winter storm Nemo crippled most of campus, the CFA Hall hosted “Guns and Gun Violence: Crisis, Policy and Politics,” a panel discussion featuring various visiting scholars. Chaired by Wesleyan’s own Professor of History and African-American Studies Leah Wright, the discussion involved professors Saul Cornell, Kristin A. Goss, and Matthew Miller from Fordham, Duke, and Harvard, respectively—a rather stacked lineup of experts. The room was packed, but in his reflection on the discussion that ensued, Wesleying’s justice described it as an echo chamber of predominantly left-leaning views:

While I will happily advocate for the liberal solution for many issues (with appropriate data as backup), I would also like to hear what people with “non-traditionally-Wesleyan” opinions have to say, especially with an issue as explosive as gun control. And this event would have been a perfect opportunity to bring in a panelist with a non-liberal perspective. But we didn’t. And we can tell ourselves all we want that this was because the “other side” simply isn’t correct, but in the end, that’s the real problem—we’re just talking to ourselves.

If you missed the event but remain interested, the Allbritton Center for Building Names That Sound Like Robots has only recently managed to post the entire thing on YouTube. Judge for yourself—watch it below, or at this link.