Tag Archives: wesneedscaps

Unofficial Orientation Series 2017: Health Resources on Campus

This is an updated version of a post originally written by Catherine MacLean ’14 which appeared on the Peer Advisor Blog and on Wesleying. It also includes a section on resources for survivors of sexual assault by Ryden Nelson ’16 and Chloe Murtagh ’15, a section on the support groups run by WeSupport by Veronica Harrington ’17, and a section on the new mental health resources initiative by Aliya Shecter ’20 and the WSA.
This is part of our 2017 Unofficial Orientation Series. A quick reminder that you can check out the welcome post here and past years’ series here.

In your time at Wes, you’ll probably need some kind of health support, whether physical, mental, or emotional, and luckily enough, there are quite a few options available. Here’s a crowdsourced rundown of many of the services available to help keep you healthy.

Wes Needs CAPS Photo Campaign

14670616_10210863822495791_2403978094994953371_nHave you heard about the #WesNeedsCAPS Campaign? Do you want to know more?:

Tell us about why you need greater accessibility to CAPS by taking part in the #WesNeedsCAPS photo campaign October 31st through November 4th @Usdan, 11am-3pm.

You can also sign the petition here: https://goo.gl/forms/5DyjFJf9bVqliKZc2

Or, fill out the anonymous survey about your experience with mental health at Wesleyan here:
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdogPCzt8-w9PIsdk3EmZ6QenqApIEVOo9nUL30os1HJ0TZOQ/viewform?c=0&w=1

At Williams and Trinity, students from 2014-15 waited at most two days to get non-emergency mental health counseling.

At Amherst, they waited a day and a half.

At Bowdoin and Connecticut College, they had no wait.

At Wesleyan, they waited three weeks.

For three weeks, students who needed counseling and support marked down the days on their calendars as they missed classes, lost sleep, dropped commitments, and suffered.

Now, a year later, they still have to wait over a week and face a limit on the number of weekly appointments they can make per year.

If Wesleyan hopes that its students will grow into leaders and torchbearers, it, as an institution, should endeavor to do the same and commit to providing students care when they need—that means no wait—for as many times as the need—that means no cap on the number of weekly visits. Namely, the budget committee should approve the CAPS fiscal year 2017 budget request and:

1. Hire two new, full-time psychologists.
2. Raise our half-time therapist up to full-time.
3. Approve the hiring of a full-time Advanced Practicing Nurse Practitioner (APRN).
4. Increase the CAPS operating budget for the first time in six years.

Date: Monday October 31-Friday November 4
Time: 11 AM-3 PM
Place: Usdan