Tag Archives: women’s history month

75 Years of WESU

Following hot on the heels of ‘s fantastic crash course in WESU, here’s another plug for you to get involved. From WESU’s very own prez, Mary Barrett ’14:

2014 marks the 75th anniversary of WESU, Wesleyan’s very own community radio station. It has been an exciting journey, from humble beginnings in 1939 in the basement of Clark, to the giddy heights of on top of Red & Black. To celebrate they have “a metric boatload” of events and special programming, so stay tuned.

One of the special programs will be an hourly, weekly show called “75 Years Of…”.  Each month “75 Years Of…” will have a singular theme, and we’ll air 75 songs relevant to that theme throughout the month.  Rather than air just their own selections, they want YOU, listeners and friends, to contribute to the playlist by helping them pick the songs. The playlist for January (75 Years of Socially Conscious Music) is done, but WESU is now taking suggestions for February – 75 Years of Lyrics Beyond the English Language, and March – 75 Years of Female Artists, in honor of Women’s History Month.

So please, give WESU your best suggestions and then tune in the final playlists. And check back for more chances to submit suggestions in the months to come.

For more information on 75th Anniversary stuff, check here.
[If you feel like giving WESU a birthday present, click here.]

“Forces Greater Than Ourselves”: An Interview with Sheila Tobias, Wesleyan’s First Female Provost

“What we were doing at Wesleyan was taking place in the context of a much larger sweep of change in American history and culture.”

Sheila Tobias with NOW Founder Betty Friedan in the 1970s while Tobias was Associate Provost for Coeducation at Wesleyan. Image courtesy of Ms. Tobias.

In September of 1970, the same month Colin Campbell became Wesleyan’s youngest ever president, Sheila Tobias arrived at Wesleyan as associate provost. A noted author, scholar, and feminist activist, Tobias’ task at Wesleyan was different than that of any previous administrator—and different than any provost since then. Wesleyan had only just begun admitting women, and for the next eight years, Tobias was to oversee the inclusion of women in student life and assist the University in hiring and retaining female faculty. She was also instrumental in bringing the first women’s studies courses to Wes.

“It wasn’t a party school, but it was a school that catered to young men in all their glory,” Tobias says of the Wesleyan of the 1960s. “That was the place that I was invited to help change.”

While Tobias says that Wesleyan transitioned into coeducation more swiftly than many of its peers (“Wesleyan did it right”), she insists that the changes on campus were part of a much larger movement. “What we were doing at Wesleyan—namely, integrating a formerly men’s college—was taking place in the context of a much larger sweep of change in American history and culture,” Tobias says.

Wesleying is psyched to present an interview with Sheila Tobias, whose published books include Overcoming Math Anxiety, They’re not Dumb, They’re Different, Breaking the Science BarrierRethinking Science as a Career, and Faces of Feminism: An Activist’s Reflections on the Women’s Movement. For more on Sheila Tobias and her career at Wesleyan, see her website or this Special Collections blog post by Cordelia Hyland ’13