Tag Archives: women’s studies

Conversation about Music, Feminism and Cultural Production with Whore Paint

whore

Feminist, artist, musician, and citizen of humanity Ally Bernstein ’13 is continuing the discussion:

How can we foster an inclusive and exciting music and arts scene at Wesleyan?

Recently, I wrote an opinion piece about the lack of female performers in Spring Fling (since then, Girl#$wag has been added to the line-up; shout out Emma Daniels ’13). Members of the band Whore Paint (hailing from Providence, RI) will be on campus at 4:00 PM to discuss their experiences and answer questions. All are welcome to come share and discuss strategies for fostering an empowering scene at Wesleyan.

Date: Saturday, May 4
Time: 4:oo PM
Place: Room 113, 41 Wyllys

Read on for Ally’s rundown of Whore Paint’s members.

The Diane Weiss ’80 Memorial Lecture: Sex, Gender and Public Life

FGSSWeissPoster

You might hear the terms “sex” and “gender” tossed around quite a bit at Wesleyan— but why exactly do these continue to be such pressing issues in our country’s public sphere?  Alanna Greco ’13 invites you to, perhaps, find out why, as the 26th annual Diane Weiss memorial explores this topic :

The Diane Weiss ’80 Memorial Lecture is an annual FGSS lecture that
the family of one of the first Women’s Studies majors at Wesleyan
endowed in her memory. This year, “Sex, Gender and Public Life”
explores both why sex and gender remain such persistent issues in the
U.S. public sphere, and also why they remain persistently separated
from issues of government and economics in that same public
discourse.

Date: Tuesday, April 16
Time: 8:00 PM
Place: Pac 001
Cost: Free

Amy Hollywood’s lecture: Apophasis and Ecstasy, at the Limits of Gender

From Anonymous ’13:

Christian women write, and they write about religion. This might seem unexceptional, yet the fact that women have written over the course of
the history of Christianity is surprising given the restrictions on women’s education and religious authority that emerge as early as the 1st century and continue to play a role in Christianity today. As if to harness the possibilities engendered by women’s writing, modern scholarship repeatedly describes women’s theological production as differing in significant ways from men’s. Why? What’s at stake in insisting on these differences? And how do texts by medieval women, particularly those of the thirteenth century Dutch-speaking beguine, Hadewijch, both exemplify and resist such categorizations?

Date: Thursday, November 8
Time:  4:15-5:15
Place: Downey 113