Tag Archives: wwi

Film Series: Lawrence of Arabia

1962. UK/USA. Dir: David Lean. With Peter O’Toole, Alec Guinness. 222 min.


When a British army officer is sent to assess the capabilities of an Arab insurgency the United Kingdom is supporting, he defies his orders and joins their struggle for independence. is influential epic bases itself not on the spectacle of violence, but on an intricate portrait of an eccentric man caught up in some- thing far larger than himself.

Tonight / 8 p.m. / Goldsmith Family Cinema / Free

Film Series: La Grande Illusion

1937. France. Dir: Jean Renoir. With Jean Gabin, Erich von Stroheim. 114 min.



After being taken prisoner during WWI, a group of French airmen separated by class and cultural background bond through their shared struggle for freedom. Renoir’s long-revered paean to the innate strength and goodness of humankind in the face of adversity was dubbed “Cinematic Public Enemy No. 1” by Nazi Propaganda Minister Joseph Goebbels.

Tonight / 8 p.m. / Goldsmith Family Cinema / Free

Posters, Propaganda, and the American Experience in World War I

call_to_action_event

From CFA staffer Andrew Chatfield:

Roundtable discussion with Professor of English Sean McCann, Professor of History Ronald Schatz, and Olin Professor of American Studies, Emeritus Richard S. Slotkin on the role of posters and propaganda in the mobilization of the United States during World War I. Topics will include the experience of immigrant and African-American soldiers, as well as the cultural response to propaganda, and tensions between state power and democracy.

Date: Thursday, November 13
Time: 5-6 PM
Place: CFA Hall, 287 Washington Terrace

Call to Action: American Posters in World War I

EFCF9585-C730-4290-9FC3-4F79284E4849From Virgil Taylor ’15:

Opening reception: Thursday, September 11, 5:00–7:00 pm

Gallery talk by Clare Rogan, DAC Curator, and Rebecca Wilton ’15, at
5:30 pm

Following the declaration of war in Europe in August 1914, each of the rival powers adopted extensive advertising campaigns to recruit soldiers, encourage women factory workers, and raise the money essential for this new, “total” war. Dramatic posters soon covered train stations, city squares, and stores, exhorting passers-by to new levels of patriotism and self-sacrifice.

After the United States entered the war in April 1917, Charles Dana Gibson founded the Division of Pictorial Publicity to organize American illustrators for war posters. Selected from the collection of the Davison Art Center, this exhibition includes more than thirty American World War I posters designed by James Montgomery FlaggHoward Chandler Christy, and others. These posters recruited soldiers, celebrated shipbuilding, called for women war workers, and urged homemakers to prepare alternative foods so wheat could be shipped to the army and allies overseas. With vibrant colors and dramatic strokes, the designers reinforced ideals of masculinity and femininity, as well the integration of immigrants into a unified concept of American identity.

The exhibition was co-curated by Clare Rogan, DAC Curator, and Rebecca Wilton ’15.

Image: John E. Sheridan (American, 1880-1948), Rivets Are Bayonets: Drive Them Home, 1917, lithographic poster. Davison Art Center collection (photo: R. J. Phil).

Date: Thursday, Sept. 11
Time: 5-7 PM
Place: Davison Art Center
Cost: FREE