Tag Archives: zen

Zen Meditation and Dharma Talk @ Buho

From Dylan Awalt-Conley ’15:

Do you keep hearing the word “Zen” tossed around and are still not quite sure what it means?

Well, come over to Buddhist House this Thursday for a guided meditation and dharma talk by Zen Master Bon Haeng (a.k.a. “Mark”). He has a BA in Religion and Philosophy from Antioch College, currently teaches at the Cambridge Zen Center in Massacheusetts, and is just generally a very enlightened / interesting dude.

There will also be free Thai food after the event and a chance to chat and hang with Master Bon Haeng (getit?). See you there!

Date: Thursday, May 2
Time: 6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.
Place: Buddhist House

Realizing the Fundamental Point: Meditation and a Talk on Zen Practice

meditation-6

Noah Rush ’14 writes in about a meditation at BuHo tomorrow, led by a Wes alum:

This is a silent meditation event conducted in the formal Zen tradition. We will chant, sit two periods of meditation, and hear a talk by the teacher. Mark Mininberg ’81, Sensei, is a dharma successor of Roshi Bernie Glassman, founder of the Zen Peacemaker Order. Sensei trained for more than twenty years at Zen Mountain Monastery under the late Abbott John Daido Loori, Roshi.

Date: April 15 (tomorrow)
Time: 6PM – 8PM
Place: Buddhist House (356 Washington Street)

Wesleyan Farmers’ Market

This just in from the lovely market managers:

When: Tomorrow, Wednesday, October 10th
Where: 11 AM to 2 PM outside Usdan
Who: Raw You-niverse Smoothies blended with power from the bike generator!
——–Sweet Sage Bakery
——–Horse Listeners Orchard
——–Zen Coffee Roasters
——–Meriano’s Bake Shoppe
——–Auntie Arwen’s Spices
——–Long Lane Farm
and lunch provided by Bon Appetit!

Bring cash (not all vendors accept credit and debit).

Just Sit There: One Year at Zen Mountain Monastery

During the 2009-10 academic year, Professor Bill Johnston took a leave of absence from Wesleyan so that he could spend a year at Zen Mountain Monastery, widely regarded as one of the leading Zen centers outside of Japan. There, he lived the life of the Zen monk, immersed in the 2,500-year-old teachings of Buddhism and focused on simple, everyday activities as well as long periods of seated meditation. Come hear how those ancient teachings have become part of our twenty-first century world, with it modern problems and technologies.

Date: Oct. 7
Time: 4:30 PM – 5:30 PM
Place: Mansfield Freeman Center for East Asian Studies